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Comparison of the effects of dietary vitamin E on in vivo and in vitro parameters of lipid peroxidation in the rabbit.
Free Radic Biol Med. 1995 Nov; 19(5):617-26.FR

Abstract

This study has investigated the effect of dietary vitamin E on markers of antioxidant status. Four groups of rabbits received diets containing 30 energy percent (en%) total fat (7.8 en% contributed by linoleic acid) for 12 weeks. D,1-alpha tocopheryl acetate was added to the diets to obtain a range of vitamin E concentrations (49, 114, 179, or 775 tocopherol equivalents per kg diet). Increased vitamin E concentrations were demonstrated in plasma lipoproteins and erythrocyte membranes following supplementation, and dietary effects on lipid peroxidation were investigated by (i) monitoring a fluorescent parinaric acid probe incorporated into erythrocyte membranes in vivo, (ii) determination of malondialdehyde and oxysterols in plasma, and (iii) investigation of the susceptibility of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to copper-induced conjugated diene formation in vitro. No effects of vitamin E were observed on parinaric acid oxidation in vivo or on the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products in plasma, but the resistance of LDL to oxidation in vitro increased significantly as vitamin E was supplemented to the diets. Our results demonstrate that under these dietary conditions (7.8 en% linoleic acid) increasing the vitamin E content of plasma and erythrocytes approximately two-fold does not reduce the level of lipid peroxidation in vivo, indicating sufficient antioxidant capacity on the lowest vitamin E diet. In contrast, LDL became more resistant to an extreme oxidative stress applied in vitro. The relevance of these assays to currently proposed mechanisms of atherosclerosis is discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unilever Research Laboratory, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8529921

Citation

Wiseman, S A., et al. "Comparison of the Effects of Dietary Vitamin E On in Vivo and in Vitro Parameters of Lipid Peroxidation in the Rabbit." Free Radical Biology & Medicine, vol. 19, no. 5, 1995, pp. 617-26.
Wiseman SA, Van den Boom MA, De Fouw NJ, et al. Comparison of the effects of dietary vitamin E on in vivo and in vitro parameters of lipid peroxidation in the rabbit. Free Radic Biol Med. 1995;19(5):617-26.
Wiseman, S. A., Van den Boom, M. A., De Fouw, N. J., Wassink, M. G., Op den Kamp, J. A., & Tijburg, L. B. (1995). Comparison of the effects of dietary vitamin E on in vivo and in vitro parameters of lipid peroxidation in the rabbit. Free Radical Biology & Medicine, 19(5), 617-26.
Wiseman SA, et al. Comparison of the Effects of Dietary Vitamin E On in Vivo and in Vitro Parameters of Lipid Peroxidation in the Rabbit. Free Radic Biol Med. 1995;19(5):617-26. PubMed PMID: 8529921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of the effects of dietary vitamin E on in vivo and in vitro parameters of lipid peroxidation in the rabbit. AU - Wiseman,S A, AU - Van den Boom,M A, AU - De Fouw,N J, AU - Wassink,M G, AU - Op den Kamp,J A, AU - Tijburg,L B, PY - 1995/11/1/pubmed PY - 1995/11/1/medline PY - 1995/11/1/entrez SP - 617 EP - 26 JF - Free radical biology & medicine JO - Free Radic Biol Med VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - This study has investigated the effect of dietary vitamin E on markers of antioxidant status. Four groups of rabbits received diets containing 30 energy percent (en%) total fat (7.8 en% contributed by linoleic acid) for 12 weeks. D,1-alpha tocopheryl acetate was added to the diets to obtain a range of vitamin E concentrations (49, 114, 179, or 775 tocopherol equivalents per kg diet). Increased vitamin E concentrations were demonstrated in plasma lipoproteins and erythrocyte membranes following supplementation, and dietary effects on lipid peroxidation were investigated by (i) monitoring a fluorescent parinaric acid probe incorporated into erythrocyte membranes in vivo, (ii) determination of malondialdehyde and oxysterols in plasma, and (iii) investigation of the susceptibility of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to copper-induced conjugated diene formation in vitro. No effects of vitamin E were observed on parinaric acid oxidation in vivo or on the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products in plasma, but the resistance of LDL to oxidation in vitro increased significantly as vitamin E was supplemented to the diets. Our results demonstrate that under these dietary conditions (7.8 en% linoleic acid) increasing the vitamin E content of plasma and erythrocytes approximately two-fold does not reduce the level of lipid peroxidation in vivo, indicating sufficient antioxidant capacity on the lowest vitamin E diet. In contrast, LDL became more resistant to an extreme oxidative stress applied in vitro. The relevance of these assays to currently proposed mechanisms of atherosclerosis is discussed. SN - 0891-5849 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8529921/Comparison_of_the_effects_of_dietary_vitamin_E_on_in_vivo_and_in_vitro_parameters_of_lipid_peroxidation_in_the_rabbit_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/089158499500078C DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -