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Drug progression model: a social control test.
Int J Addict. 1995 Sep; 30(11):1383-405.IJ

Abstract

A social control drug progression model was delineated and tested using a sample of 2,626 high school students from the southwestern United States. Along with the social control constructs of parental attachment, educational attachment, religious attachment, and conventional values, we incorporated alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use into the model as intervening variables. The model explains 39% of the variation in the self-reported amphetamine use and 24% of the variation in "hard drug" use (cocaine, heroin, LSD, and PCP). The findings suggest that the integration of social control theory and drug progression improves the predictive power of the model of adolescent drug use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology, American College of Greece, Aghia Paraskevi Attikis, Greece.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8530212

Citation

Marcos, A C., and S J. Bahr. "Drug Progression Model: a Social Control Test." The International Journal of the Addictions, vol. 30, no. 11, 1995, pp. 1383-405.
Marcos AC, Bahr SJ. Drug progression model: a social control test. Int J Addict. 1995;30(11):1383-405.
Marcos, A. C., & Bahr, S. J. (1995). Drug progression model: a social control test. The International Journal of the Addictions, 30(11), 1383-405.
Marcos AC, Bahr SJ. Drug Progression Model: a Social Control Test. Int J Addict. 1995;30(11):1383-405. PubMed PMID: 8530212.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Drug progression model: a social control test. AU - Marcos,A C, AU - Bahr,S J, PY - 1995/9/1/pubmed PY - 1995/9/1/medline PY - 1995/9/1/entrez SP - 1383 EP - 405 JF - The International journal of the addictions JO - Int J Addict VL - 30 IS - 11 N2 - A social control drug progression model was delineated and tested using a sample of 2,626 high school students from the southwestern United States. Along with the social control constructs of parental attachment, educational attachment, religious attachment, and conventional values, we incorporated alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use into the model as intervening variables. The model explains 39% of the variation in the self-reported amphetamine use and 24% of the variation in "hard drug" use (cocaine, heroin, LSD, and PCP). The findings suggest that the integration of social control theory and drug progression improves the predictive power of the model of adolescent drug use. SN - 0020-773X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8530212/Drug_progression_model:_a_social_control_test_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/druguseandaddiction.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -