Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Melatonin-induced temperature suppression and its acute phase-shifting effects correlate in a dose-dependent manner in humans.
Brain Res 1995; 688(1-2):77-85BR

Abstract

Melatonin is able to phase-shift the endogenous circadian clock and can induce acute temperature suppression. It is possible that there is a direct relationship between these phenomena. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 6 healthy volunteers maintained a regular sleep/wake cycle in a normal environment. From dusk until 24:00 h on days (D) 1-4 subjects remained in dim artificial lighting (< 50 lux) and darkness (< 1 lux) from 24:00-08:00 h. At 17:00 h on D3 either melatonin (0.05 mg, 0.5 mg or 5 mg) or placebo was administered. Melatonin treatment induced acute, dose-dependent temperature suppression and decrements in alertness and performance efficiency. On the night of D3, earlier sleep onset, offset and better sleep quality were associated with increasing doses of melatonin. The following day, a significant dose-dependent phase-advance in the plasma melatonin onset time and temperature nadir (D4-5) was observed with a trend for the alertness rhythm to phase-advance. A significant dose-response relationship existed between the dose of oral melatonin, the magnitude of temperature suppression and the degree of advance phase shift in the endogenous melatonin and temperature rhythms, suggesting that acute changes in body temperature by melatonin may be a primary event in phase-shifting mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8542325

Citation

Deacon, S, and J Arendt. "Melatonin-induced Temperature Suppression and Its Acute Phase-shifting Effects Correlate in a Dose-dependent Manner in Humans." Brain Research, vol. 688, no. 1-2, 1995, pp. 77-85.
Deacon S, Arendt J. Melatonin-induced temperature suppression and its acute phase-shifting effects correlate in a dose-dependent manner in humans. Brain Res. 1995;688(1-2):77-85.
Deacon, S., & Arendt, J. (1995). Melatonin-induced temperature suppression and its acute phase-shifting effects correlate in a dose-dependent manner in humans. Brain Research, 688(1-2), pp. 77-85.
Deacon S, Arendt J. Melatonin-induced Temperature Suppression and Its Acute Phase-shifting Effects Correlate in a Dose-dependent Manner in Humans. Brain Res. 1995 Aug 7;688(1-2):77-85. PubMed PMID: 8542325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Melatonin-induced temperature suppression and its acute phase-shifting effects correlate in a dose-dependent manner in humans. AU - Deacon,S, AU - Arendt,J, PY - 1995/8/7/pubmed PY - 1995/8/7/medline PY - 1995/8/7/entrez SP - 77 EP - 85 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res. VL - 688 IS - 1-2 N2 - Melatonin is able to phase-shift the endogenous circadian clock and can induce acute temperature suppression. It is possible that there is a direct relationship between these phenomena. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 6 healthy volunteers maintained a regular sleep/wake cycle in a normal environment. From dusk until 24:00 h on days (D) 1-4 subjects remained in dim artificial lighting (< 50 lux) and darkness (< 1 lux) from 24:00-08:00 h. At 17:00 h on D3 either melatonin (0.05 mg, 0.5 mg or 5 mg) or placebo was administered. Melatonin treatment induced acute, dose-dependent temperature suppression and decrements in alertness and performance efficiency. On the night of D3, earlier sleep onset, offset and better sleep quality were associated with increasing doses of melatonin. The following day, a significant dose-dependent phase-advance in the plasma melatonin onset time and temperature nadir (D4-5) was observed with a trend for the alertness rhythm to phase-advance. A significant dose-response relationship existed between the dose of oral melatonin, the magnitude of temperature suppression and the degree of advance phase shift in the endogenous melatonin and temperature rhythms, suggesting that acute changes in body temperature by melatonin may be a primary event in phase-shifting mechanisms. SN - 0006-8993 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8542325/Melatonin_induced_temperature_suppression_and_its_acute_phase_shifting_effects_correlate_in_a_dose_dependent_manner_in_humans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0006-8993(95)96872-I DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -