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The thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in alcoholism.
Alcohol Alcohol. 1995 Sep; 30(5):661-7.AA

Abstract

The mechanism for a blunted thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) in alcoholics is not known. We performed a combined TRH and gonadoliberin stimulation test on three well-defined groups of nondepressed alcoholic men. Group A comprised patients with acute withdrawal symptoms (n = 28), group B patients abstinent for 5-8 weeks (n = 29) and group C patients who had been abstinent for > 2 years (n = 16). Twenty-two healthy male volunteers were used for comparison. A blunted TSH response to TRH (delta TSH < 5 microU/l) occurred only in groups A (39%) and B (17%). In group A delta TSH showed a significant negative correlation with the severity of withdrawal symptoms and a significant positive correlation with serum magnesium levels. In group B, patients with a family history of alcoholism had significantly lower delta TSH levels than those without such a family history. Groups did not differ with respect to basal and delta prolactin, and TSH responses were not significantly associated with vitamin deficiency, cortisol levels or free thyroid hormone levels. We conclude that TRH stimulation test blunting appears to be related to factors operating in the withdrawal state and improves with continued abstinence. A possible role of genetic factors and serum magnesium needs to be further explored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg, South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8554651

Citation

Pienaar, W P., et al. "The Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in Alcoholism." Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), vol. 30, no. 5, 1995, pp. 661-7.
Pienaar WP, Roberts MC, Emsley RA, et al. The thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in alcoholism. Alcohol Alcohol. 1995;30(5):661-7.
Pienaar, W. P., Roberts, M. C., Emsley, R. A., Aalbers, C., & Taljaard, F. J. (1995). The thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in alcoholism. Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), 30(5), 661-7.
Pienaar WP, et al. The Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in Alcoholism. Alcohol Alcohol. 1995;30(5):661-7. PubMed PMID: 8554651.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in alcoholism. AU - Pienaar,W P, AU - Roberts,M C, AU - Emsley,R A, AU - Aalbers,C, AU - Taljaard,F J, PY - 1995/9/1/pubmed PY - 1995/9/1/medline PY - 1995/9/1/entrez SP - 661 EP - 7 JF - Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire) JO - Alcohol Alcohol VL - 30 IS - 5 N2 - The mechanism for a blunted thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) in alcoholics is not known. We performed a combined TRH and gonadoliberin stimulation test on three well-defined groups of nondepressed alcoholic men. Group A comprised patients with acute withdrawal symptoms (n = 28), group B patients abstinent for 5-8 weeks (n = 29) and group C patients who had been abstinent for > 2 years (n = 16). Twenty-two healthy male volunteers were used for comparison. A blunted TSH response to TRH (delta TSH < 5 microU/l) occurred only in groups A (39%) and B (17%). In group A delta TSH showed a significant negative correlation with the severity of withdrawal symptoms and a significant positive correlation with serum magnesium levels. In group B, patients with a family history of alcoholism had significantly lower delta TSH levels than those without such a family history. Groups did not differ with respect to basal and delta prolactin, and TSH responses were not significantly associated with vitamin deficiency, cortisol levels or free thyroid hormone levels. We conclude that TRH stimulation test blunting appears to be related to factors operating in the withdrawal state and improves with continued abstinence. A possible role of genetic factors and serum magnesium needs to be further explored. SN - 0735-0414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8554651/The_thyrotropin_releasing_hormone_stimulation_test_in_alcoholism_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alcoholusedisorderaud.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -