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Assessment of dietary phylloquinone intake and vitamin K status in postmenopausal women.
Eur J Clin Nutr 1995; 49(11):832-41EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationship between dietary phylloquinone intake and vitamin K status of postmenopausal Caucasian women.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study, in which dietary intake was estimated using weighed record techniques and vitamin K status was measured by a single plasma phylloquinone concentration and 24-h urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) excretion.

SETTING

The metabolic research unit at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA.

SUBJECTS

402 healthy postmenopausal Caucasian women who were participating in a randomized trial to determine the effect of calcium supplementation on bone loss. Of the original group, 362 had complete weighed diet records, 358 had corresponding plasma phylloquinone concentrations, and 346 had corresponding urinary Gla measurements.

RESULTS

There was a significant correlation (r = 0.13, P = 0.01) between total dietary intake of phylloquinone (geometric mean = 89 micrograms/day) and plasma phylloquinone levels (mean = 1.12 nmol/l). Dietary intake was neither correlated with urinary Gla excretion (mean = 4.0 mumol/mmol creatinine) nor did it vary by season. The ratio of intra- to interindividual variance in phylloquinone intake was 2.6, from which it was estimated that 5 days of independent recording is necessary to estimate true usual dietary intake, assuming a correlation of 0.8.

CONCLUSIONS

A weighed record has the potential to be a reliable method for estimating dietary intakes of vitamin K which relate to plasma phylloquinone levels used as an indicator of vitamin K status in postmenopausal Caucasian women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8557021

Citation

Booth, S L., et al. "Assessment of Dietary Phylloquinone Intake and Vitamin K Status in Postmenopausal Women." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 49, no. 11, 1995, pp. 832-41.
Booth SL, Sokoll LJ, O'Brien ME, et al. Assessment of dietary phylloquinone intake and vitamin K status in postmenopausal women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995;49(11):832-41.
Booth, S. L., Sokoll, L. J., O'Brien, M. E., Tucker, K., Dawson-Hughes, B., & Sadowski, J. A. (1995). Assessment of dietary phylloquinone intake and vitamin K status in postmenopausal women. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 49(11), pp. 832-41.
Booth SL, et al. Assessment of Dietary Phylloquinone Intake and Vitamin K Status in Postmenopausal Women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995;49(11):832-41. PubMed PMID: 8557021.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment of dietary phylloquinone intake and vitamin K status in postmenopausal women. AU - Booth,S L, AU - Sokoll,L J, AU - O'Brien,M E, AU - Tucker,K, AU - Dawson-Hughes,B, AU - Sadowski,J A, PY - 1995/11/1/pubmed PY - 1995/11/1/medline PY - 1995/11/1/entrez SP - 832 EP - 41 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 49 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between dietary phylloquinone intake and vitamin K status of postmenopausal Caucasian women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, in which dietary intake was estimated using weighed record techniques and vitamin K status was measured by a single plasma phylloquinone concentration and 24-h urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) excretion. SETTING: The metabolic research unit at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA. SUBJECTS: 402 healthy postmenopausal Caucasian women who were participating in a randomized trial to determine the effect of calcium supplementation on bone loss. Of the original group, 362 had complete weighed diet records, 358 had corresponding plasma phylloquinone concentrations, and 346 had corresponding urinary Gla measurements. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation (r = 0.13, P = 0.01) between total dietary intake of phylloquinone (geometric mean = 89 micrograms/day) and plasma phylloquinone levels (mean = 1.12 nmol/l). Dietary intake was neither correlated with urinary Gla excretion (mean = 4.0 mumol/mmol creatinine) nor did it vary by season. The ratio of intra- to interindividual variance in phylloquinone intake was 2.6, from which it was estimated that 5 days of independent recording is necessary to estimate true usual dietary intake, assuming a correlation of 0.8. CONCLUSIONS: A weighed record has the potential to be a reliable method for estimating dietary intakes of vitamin K which relate to plasma phylloquinone levels used as an indicator of vitamin K status in postmenopausal Caucasian women. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8557021/Assessment_of_dietary_phylloquinone_intake_and_vitamin_K_status_in_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vitamink.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -