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The adverse impact of heavy episodic drinkers on other college students.
J Stud Alcohol 1995; 56(6):628-34JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

College student survey data were examined to assess the impact of campus levels of heavy episodic drinking on nonheavy episodic drinking college students.

METHOD

Analyses are based on a survey mailed to a random sample of college students at 140 American colleges. A total of 17,592 students (69%) at participating colleges responded. The study defined "heavy" drinking as the consumption of five or more drinks in a row for men and four or more for women, and divided schools into approximately equal categories: lower drinking level schools where 35% or fewer students were heavy drinkers; midlevel schools (36-50% heavy drinkers); and high drinking level schools where over 50% of the students were heavy drinkers.

RESULTS

Residing on campus at high drinking level schools adversely affected students who were not engaging in heavy drinking. The odds of experiencing at least one problem from other students' drinking was 3.6 to 1 when nonheavy drinking students at high drinking level schools were compared to nonheavy drinking students at lower drinking level schools. Examples of such secondary heavy drinking effects included being hit or assaulted, having one's property damaged or experiencing an unwanted sexual advance.

CONCLUSIONS

College alcohol prevention efforts should include a focus on the needs of students who are not engaging in heavy drinking yet may be adversely impacted by other students' heavy drinking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Social Behavior, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8558894

Citation

Wechsler, H, et al. "The Adverse Impact of Heavy Episodic Drinkers On Other College Students." Journal of Studies On Alcohol, vol. 56, no. 6, 1995, pp. 628-34.
Wechsler H, Moeykens B, Davenport A, et al. The adverse impact of heavy episodic drinkers on other college students. J Stud Alcohol. 1995;56(6):628-34.
Wechsler, H., Moeykens, B., Davenport, A., Castillo, S., & Hansen, J. (1995). The adverse impact of heavy episodic drinkers on other college students. Journal of Studies On Alcohol, 56(6), pp. 628-34.
Wechsler H, et al. The Adverse Impact of Heavy Episodic Drinkers On Other College Students. J Stud Alcohol. 1995;56(6):628-34. PubMed PMID: 8558894.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The adverse impact of heavy episodic drinkers on other college students. AU - Wechsler,H, AU - Moeykens,B, AU - Davenport,A, AU - Castillo,S, AU - Hansen,J, PY - 1995/11/1/pubmed PY - 1995/11/1/medline PY - 1995/11/1/entrez SP - 628 EP - 34 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol JO - J. Stud. Alcohol VL - 56 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: College student survey data were examined to assess the impact of campus levels of heavy episodic drinking on nonheavy episodic drinking college students. METHOD: Analyses are based on a survey mailed to a random sample of college students at 140 American colleges. A total of 17,592 students (69%) at participating colleges responded. The study defined "heavy" drinking as the consumption of five or more drinks in a row for men and four or more for women, and divided schools into approximately equal categories: lower drinking level schools where 35% or fewer students were heavy drinkers; midlevel schools (36-50% heavy drinkers); and high drinking level schools where over 50% of the students were heavy drinkers. RESULTS: Residing on campus at high drinking level schools adversely affected students who were not engaging in heavy drinking. The odds of experiencing at least one problem from other students' drinking was 3.6 to 1 when nonheavy drinking students at high drinking level schools were compared to nonheavy drinking students at lower drinking level schools. Examples of such secondary heavy drinking effects included being hit or assaulted, having one's property damaged or experiencing an unwanted sexual advance. CONCLUSIONS: College alcohol prevention efforts should include a focus on the needs of students who are not engaging in heavy drinking yet may be adversely impacted by other students' heavy drinking. SN - 0096-882X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8558894/The_adverse_impact_of_heavy_episodic_drinkers_on_other_college_students_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/10.15288/jsa.1995.56.628 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -