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Pregnancy in sickle cell disease: experience of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease.
Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Feb; 87(2):199-204.OG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease.

METHODS

The subjects were part of a cohort recruited from 19 centers for a prospective study of the clinical course of sickle cell disease. Each participant was evaluated using a structured protocol in which steady-state data and information on both sickle- and non-sickle-related events were collected. The rates of antepartum and intrapartum complications were tallied for pregnancies carried to delivery. Fetal outcome was assessed according to gestational age, birth weight, and Apgar score. Differences among genotypes in event rates were assessed using Fisher exact test. Differences in gestational age and birth weight, and predictors of these outcomes, were assessed using analyses of covariance.

RESULTS

Two hundred eighty-six of the 445 reported pregnancies proceeded to delivery. Non-sickle-related antepartum and intrapartum complication rates were comparable with those of African-American women who did not have sickle cell disease. One of the two deaths observed during this study was directly related to the presence of sickle cell disease. Rates of maternal morbidity from sickle cell disease were the same during pregnancy as during the nonpregnant state. Ninety-nine percent of those pregnancies carried to delivery resulted in a live birth. Twenty-one percent of the infants born to women of the SS genotype were small for gestational age (SGA). Preeclampsia and acute anemic events were identified as risk factors for SGA infants.

CONCLUSIONS

Those caring for women with sickle cell disease should support them if they desire to have children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Harlem Hospital Center-Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8559523

Citation

Smith, J A., et al. "Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease: Experience of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 87, no. 2, 1996, pp. 199-204.
Smith JA, Espeland M, Bellevue R, et al. Pregnancy in sickle cell disease: experience of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. Obstet Gynecol. 1996;87(2):199-204.
Smith, J. A., Espeland, M., Bellevue, R., Bonds, D., Brown, A. K., & Koshy, M. (1996). Pregnancy in sickle cell disease: experience of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 87(2), 199-204.
Smith JA, et al. Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease: Experience of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. Obstet Gynecol. 1996;87(2):199-204. PubMed PMID: 8559523.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pregnancy in sickle cell disease: experience of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. AU - Smith,J A, AU - Espeland,M, AU - Bellevue,R, AU - Bonds,D, AU - Brown,A K, AU - Koshy,M, PY - 1996/2/1/pubmed PY - 1996/2/1/medline PY - 1996/2/1/entrez SP - 199 EP - 204 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 87 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease. METHODS: The subjects were part of a cohort recruited from 19 centers for a prospective study of the clinical course of sickle cell disease. Each participant was evaluated using a structured protocol in which steady-state data and information on both sickle- and non-sickle-related events were collected. The rates of antepartum and intrapartum complications were tallied for pregnancies carried to delivery. Fetal outcome was assessed according to gestational age, birth weight, and Apgar score. Differences among genotypes in event rates were assessed using Fisher exact test. Differences in gestational age and birth weight, and predictors of these outcomes, were assessed using analyses of covariance. RESULTS: Two hundred eighty-six of the 445 reported pregnancies proceeded to delivery. Non-sickle-related antepartum and intrapartum complication rates were comparable with those of African-American women who did not have sickle cell disease. One of the two deaths observed during this study was directly related to the presence of sickle cell disease. Rates of maternal morbidity from sickle cell disease were the same during pregnancy as during the nonpregnant state. Ninety-nine percent of those pregnancies carried to delivery resulted in a live birth. Twenty-one percent of the infants born to women of the SS genotype were small for gestational age (SGA). Preeclampsia and acute anemic events were identified as risk factors for SGA infants. CONCLUSIONS: Those caring for women with sickle cell disease should support them if they desire to have children. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8559523/Pregnancy_in_sickle_cell_disease:_experience_of_the_Cooperative_Study_of_Sickle_Cell_Disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0029-7844(95)00367-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -