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Bowel habit in relation to age and gender. Findings from the National Health Interview Survey and clinical implications.
Arch Intern Med. 1996 Feb 12; 156(3):315-20.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Constipation is widely considered to be a common problem among the elderly, as evidenced by the high rate of laxative use in this population. Yet, age-related prevalence studies of constipation generally do not distinguish between actual alteration in bowel movement frequency and subjective self-report of constipation.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the relationship between advancing age and bowel habit.

METHODS

We employed data collected on 42,375 subjects who participated in the National Health Interview Survey on Digestive Disorders based on interviews with a random nationwide sample of US households. We examined the following characteristics reported by this population according to selected age groupings by decade: constipation, levels of laxative use, and two bowel movements per week or less.

RESULTS

Contrary to conventional wisdom, there was no age-related increase in the proportion of subjects reporting infrequent bowel movements. Nonetheless, the prevalence of self-report of constipation increased with advancing age, with a greater proportion of women reporting this symptom than men across all age groups. Laxative use also increased substantially with aging; while women were more likely to use laxatives than men, this effect attenuated with advancing age. A U-shaped relationship was observed between advancing age and bowel habit in men and women; 5.9% of individuals younger than 40 years reported two bowel movements per week or less compared with 3.8% of those aged 60 to 69 years and 6.3% of those aged 80 years or older. This relationship persisted after adjusting for laxative use.

CONCLUSION

These findings suggest that a decline in bowel movement frequency is not an invariable concomitant of aging. In elderly patients who report being constipated, it is essential to take a careful physical, psychological, and bowel history rather than to automatically assume the need for laxative use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division on Aging, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8572842

Citation

Harari, D, et al. "Bowel Habit in Relation to Age and Gender. Findings From the National Health Interview Survey and Clinical Implications." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 156, no. 3, 1996, pp. 315-20.
Harari D, Gurwitz JH, Avorn J, et al. Bowel habit in relation to age and gender. Findings from the National Health Interview Survey and clinical implications. Arch Intern Med. 1996;156(3):315-20.
Harari, D., Gurwitz, J. H., Avorn, J., Bohn, R., & Minaker, K. L. (1996). Bowel habit in relation to age and gender. Findings from the National Health Interview Survey and clinical implications. Archives of Internal Medicine, 156(3), 315-20.
Harari D, et al. Bowel Habit in Relation to Age and Gender. Findings From the National Health Interview Survey and Clinical Implications. Arch Intern Med. 1996 Feb 12;156(3):315-20. PubMed PMID: 8572842.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bowel habit in relation to age and gender. Findings from the National Health Interview Survey and clinical implications. AU - Harari,D, AU - Gurwitz,J H, AU - Avorn,J, AU - Bohn,R, AU - Minaker,K L, PY - 1996/2/12/pubmed PY - 1996/2/12/medline PY - 1996/2/12/entrez SP - 315 EP - 20 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 156 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Constipation is widely considered to be a common problem among the elderly, as evidenced by the high rate of laxative use in this population. Yet, age-related prevalence studies of constipation generally do not distinguish between actual alteration in bowel movement frequency and subjective self-report of constipation. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between advancing age and bowel habit. METHODS: We employed data collected on 42,375 subjects who participated in the National Health Interview Survey on Digestive Disorders based on interviews with a random nationwide sample of US households. We examined the following characteristics reported by this population according to selected age groupings by decade: constipation, levels of laxative use, and two bowel movements per week or less. RESULTS: Contrary to conventional wisdom, there was no age-related increase in the proportion of subjects reporting infrequent bowel movements. Nonetheless, the prevalence of self-report of constipation increased with advancing age, with a greater proportion of women reporting this symptom than men across all age groups. Laxative use also increased substantially with aging; while women were more likely to use laxatives than men, this effect attenuated with advancing age. A U-shaped relationship was observed between advancing age and bowel habit in men and women; 5.9% of individuals younger than 40 years reported two bowel movements per week or less compared with 3.8% of those aged 60 to 69 years and 6.3% of those aged 80 years or older. This relationship persisted after adjusting for laxative use. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that a decline in bowel movement frequency is not an invariable concomitant of aging. In elderly patients who report being constipated, it is essential to take a careful physical, psychological, and bowel history rather than to automatically assume the need for laxative use. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8572842/Bowel_habit_in_relation_to_age_and_gender__Findings_from_the_National_Health_Interview_Survey_and_clinical_implications_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/156/pg/315 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -