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Use of orally administered succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) for treatment of lead poisoning in dogs.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1996 Feb 01; 208(3):371-5.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) would be effective in reducing blood lead concentration in dogs with naturally acquired lead poisoning and whether treated dogs would develop clinically important adverse effects.

DESIGN

Prospective case series.

ANIMALS

13 dogs with moderate-to-high blood lead concentrations (39 to 120 micrograms/dl) and clinical signs of lead poisoning.

PROCEDURE

Dogs were treated with succimer (10 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 8 h) for 10 days. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for lead concentration before, during, and after treatment with succimer.

RESULTS

Mean blood lead concentrations on days 0, 3, 7, and 20 were 70.6, 32.7, 16.8, and 27.6 micrograms/dl, respectively. Mean blood lead concentrations decreased 53.6, 76.2, and 60.9% from pretreatment value on days 3, 7, and 20, respectively. Mean urine lead concentrations on days 0, 3, 7, and 20 were 70.0, 485.4, 254.3, and 28.3 micrograms/dl, respectively.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

In dogs with naturally acquired lead poisoning, succimer administered orally for 10 days effectively reduced blood lead concentrations and eliminated clinical signs of lead poisoning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8575967

Citation

Ramsey, D T., et al. "Use of Orally Administered Succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic Acid) for Treatment of Lead Poisoning in Dogs." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 208, no. 3, 1996, pp. 371-5.
Ramsey DT, Casteel SW, Faggella AM, et al. Use of orally administered succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) for treatment of lead poisoning in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1996;208(3):371-5.
Ramsey, D. T., Casteel, S. W., Faggella, A. M., Chastain, C. B., Nunn, J. W., & Schaeffer, D. J. (1996). Use of orally administered succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) for treatment of lead poisoning in dogs. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 208(3), 371-5.
Ramsey DT, et al. Use of Orally Administered Succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic Acid) for Treatment of Lead Poisoning in Dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1996 Feb 1;208(3):371-5. PubMed PMID: 8575967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of orally administered succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) for treatment of lead poisoning in dogs. AU - Ramsey,D T, AU - Casteel,S W, AU - Faggella,A M, AU - Chastain,C B, AU - Nunn,J W, AU - Schaeffer,D J, PY - 1996/2/1/pubmed PY - 1996/2/1/medline PY - 1996/2/1/entrez SP - 371 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. VL - 208 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) would be effective in reducing blood lead concentration in dogs with naturally acquired lead poisoning and whether treated dogs would develop clinically important adverse effects. DESIGN: Prospective case series. ANIMALS: 13 dogs with moderate-to-high blood lead concentrations (39 to 120 micrograms/dl) and clinical signs of lead poisoning. PROCEDURE: Dogs were treated with succimer (10 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 8 h) for 10 days. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for lead concentration before, during, and after treatment with succimer. RESULTS: Mean blood lead concentrations on days 0, 3, 7, and 20 were 70.6, 32.7, 16.8, and 27.6 micrograms/dl, respectively. Mean blood lead concentrations decreased 53.6, 76.2, and 60.9% from pretreatment value on days 3, 7, and 20, respectively. Mean urine lead concentrations on days 0, 3, 7, and 20 were 70.0, 485.4, 254.3, and 28.3 micrograms/dl, respectively. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: In dogs with naturally acquired lead poisoning, succimer administered orally for 10 days effectively reduced blood lead concentrations and eliminated clinical signs of lead poisoning. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8575967/Use_of_orally_administered_succimer__meso_23_dimercaptosuccinic_acid__for_treatment_of_lead_poisoning_in_dogs_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/leadpoisoning.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -