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Responses to temperate, cold, and hot environments and the effect of physical training.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1977 Mar; 48(3):254-60.AS

Abstract

Ten young men underwent several tests before and after a training program: a bicycle ergometer test and 60 min of moderate exercise performed at a temperate 24 degrees C; the same work load performed in heat (40.0 degrees C DB, 30.4 degrees C WB) for 3 h; and cold (10 degrees C) exposure for 60 min. Training consisted of 13 1-h sessions of hard, strenuous, and exhaustive work performed in temperate conditions four times a week. Training resulted in substantial decreases in heart rate and rectal temperature responses to exercise in temperate, minor increases in hot, and no significant changes in cold conditions. Subjects who showed good responses to heat, also showed good responses at 24 degrees C, and poor compensatory responses to cold, which were indicated by relatively low heat production and rectal temperature values, and relatively high body heat loss and extremities temperature values. Subjects who showed poor heat tolerance also showed poor responses in temperate and good compensatory responses in cold conditions. Positive correlation coefficients were found between rectal temperatures in the three environments, and between heart rate and sweat rate responses in temperate and hot conditions. The results indicated that moderately severe training causes minor tolerance improvements in heat and no changes in cold, and that responses in temperate, cold, and hot environments are interdependent.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

857801

Citation

Shvartz, E, et al. "Responses to Temperate, Cold, and Hot Environments and the Effect of Physical Training." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 48, no. 3, 1977, pp. 254-60.
Shvartz E, Glick Z, Magazanik A. Responses to temperate, cold, and hot environments and the effect of physical training. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1977;48(3):254-60.
Shvartz, E., Glick, Z., & Magazanik, A. (1977). Responses to temperate, cold, and hot environments and the effect of physical training. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 48(3), 254-60.
Shvartz E, Glick Z, Magazanik A. Responses to Temperate, Cold, and Hot Environments and the Effect of Physical Training. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1977;48(3):254-60. PubMed PMID: 857801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Responses to temperate, cold, and hot environments and the effect of physical training. AU - Shvartz,E, AU - Glick,Z, AU - Magazanik,A, PY - 1977/3/1/pubmed PY - 1977/3/1/medline PY - 1977/3/1/entrez SP - 254 EP - 60 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 48 IS - 3 N2 - Ten young men underwent several tests before and after a training program: a bicycle ergometer test and 60 min of moderate exercise performed at a temperate 24 degrees C; the same work load performed in heat (40.0 degrees C DB, 30.4 degrees C WB) for 3 h; and cold (10 degrees C) exposure for 60 min. Training consisted of 13 1-h sessions of hard, strenuous, and exhaustive work performed in temperate conditions four times a week. Training resulted in substantial decreases in heart rate and rectal temperature responses to exercise in temperate, minor increases in hot, and no significant changes in cold conditions. Subjects who showed good responses to heat, also showed good responses at 24 degrees C, and poor compensatory responses to cold, which were indicated by relatively low heat production and rectal temperature values, and relatively high body heat loss and extremities temperature values. Subjects who showed poor heat tolerance also showed poor responses in temperate and good compensatory responses in cold conditions. Positive correlation coefficients were found between rectal temperatures in the three environments, and between heart rate and sweat rate responses in temperate and hot conditions. The results indicated that moderately severe training causes minor tolerance improvements in heat and no changes in cold, and that responses in temperate, cold, and hot environments are interdependent. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/857801/Responses_to_temperate_cold_and_hot_environments_and_the_effect_of_physical_training_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -