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In previously immunized elderly adults inactivated influenza A (H1N1) virus vaccines induce poor antibody responses that are not enhanced by liposome adjuvant.

Abstract

In a randomized, double-blinded study, 77 healthy elderly seropositive volunteers (95% of whom had received influenza vaccine within the prior 5 years) were immunized with either monovalent liposome-adjuvanted or control subvirion vaccine containing inactivated influenza A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1) virus. The experimental vaccine was well-tolerated but elicited serologic responses that were no different in frequency or magnitude from those induced by the control vaccine. Less than 20% of subjects in either group mounted a fourfold or greater rise in antibody titer. Sixty-three elderly subjects who had participated in the liposome vaccine trial were reimmunized 18 weeks later with licensed trivalent subvirion vaccine, and their serologic responses were compared with those of 26 young adults. Significant rises in hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody titers to the A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1), A/Beijing/32/92 (H3N2) and B/Panama/45/90 components occurred in 10%, 76% and 56% of elderly vaccinees, respectively, compared to 92% (p < 0.0001), 100% (p < 0.005) and 88% (p < 0.005) of young vaccines, respectively. Age differences in seroresponse rates to the H1N1 subtype antigen were significant even when comparing young and old adults with identical prevaccination HAI antibody titers. These data confirm prior observations suggesting that previously immunized elderly persons have impaired serologic responses to influenza vaccines, particularly against recently circulating H1N1 subtype antigens. It remains unclear whether liposome-adjuvanted formulations would have an advantage over conventional influenza vaccines for routine annual reimmunization of targeted populations.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division, St. Louis, MO 63125-4199, USA.

    ,

    Source

    Vaccine 13:14 1995 Oct pg 1330-5

    MeSH

    Adjuvants, Immunologic
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Antibodies, Viral
    Double-Blind Method
    Humans
    Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
    Influenza A virus
    Influenza Vaccines
    Liposomes
    Middle Aged
    Vaccines, Inactivated

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    8585289

    Citation

    Powers, D C., et al. "In Previously Immunized Elderly Adults Inactivated Influenza a (H1N1) Virus Vaccines Induce Poor Antibody Responses That Are Not Enhanced By Liposome Adjuvant." Vaccine, vol. 13, no. 14, 1995, pp. 1330-5.
    Powers DC, Hanscome PJ, Pietrobon PJ. In previously immunized elderly adults inactivated influenza A (H1N1) virus vaccines induce poor antibody responses that are not enhanced by liposome adjuvant. Vaccine. 1995;13(14):1330-5.
    Powers, D. C., Hanscome, P. J., & Pietrobon, P. J. (1995). In previously immunized elderly adults inactivated influenza A (H1N1) virus vaccines induce poor antibody responses that are not enhanced by liposome adjuvant. Vaccine, 13(14), pp. 1330-5.
    Powers DC, Hanscome PJ, Pietrobon PJ. In Previously Immunized Elderly Adults Inactivated Influenza a (H1N1) Virus Vaccines Induce Poor Antibody Responses That Are Not Enhanced By Liposome Adjuvant. Vaccine. 1995;13(14):1330-5. PubMed PMID: 8585289.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - In previously immunized elderly adults inactivated influenza A (H1N1) virus vaccines induce poor antibody responses that are not enhanced by liposome adjuvant. AU - Powers,D C, AU - Hanscome,P J, AU - Pietrobon,P J, PY - 1995/10/1/pubmed PY - 1995/10/1/medline PY - 1995/10/1/entrez SP - 1330 EP - 5 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 13 IS - 14 N2 - In a randomized, double-blinded study, 77 healthy elderly seropositive volunteers (95% of whom had received influenza vaccine within the prior 5 years) were immunized with either monovalent liposome-adjuvanted or control subvirion vaccine containing inactivated influenza A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1) virus. The experimental vaccine was well-tolerated but elicited serologic responses that were no different in frequency or magnitude from those induced by the control vaccine. Less than 20% of subjects in either group mounted a fourfold or greater rise in antibody titer. Sixty-three elderly subjects who had participated in the liposome vaccine trial were reimmunized 18 weeks later with licensed trivalent subvirion vaccine, and their serologic responses were compared with those of 26 young adults. Significant rises in hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody titers to the A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1), A/Beijing/32/92 (H3N2) and B/Panama/45/90 components occurred in 10%, 76% and 56% of elderly vaccinees, respectively, compared to 92% (p < 0.0001), 100% (p < 0.005) and 88% (p < 0.005) of young vaccines, respectively. Age differences in seroresponse rates to the H1N1 subtype antigen were significant even when comparing young and old adults with identical prevaccination HAI antibody titers. These data confirm prior observations suggesting that previously immunized elderly persons have impaired serologic responses to influenza vaccines, particularly against recently circulating H1N1 subtype antigens. It remains unclear whether liposome-adjuvanted formulations would have an advantage over conventional influenza vaccines for routine annual reimmunization of targeted populations. SN - 0264-410X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8585289/In_previously_immunized_elderly_adults_inactivated_influenza_A__H1N1__virus_vaccines_induce_poor_antibody_responses_that_are_not_enhanced_by_liposome_adjuvant_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0264410X9500002I DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -