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Exposure-response analysis of mortality among coal miners in the United States.

Abstract

The quantitative relationship between exposure to respirable coal mine dust and mortality from nonmalignant respiratory diseases was investigated in a study of 8,878 working male coal miners who were medically examined from 1969 to 1971 and followed to 1979. Exposure-related mortality was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards modeling for underlying or contributing causes of death and modified lifetable methods for underlying causes. For pneumoconiosis mortality, the lifetable analyses showed increasing standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) with increasing cumulative exposure category. Significant exposure-response relationships for mortality from pneumoconiosis (p < 0.001) and from chronic bronchitis or emphysema (p < 0.05) were observed in the proportional hazards models after controlling for age and smoking. No exposure-related increases in lung cancer or stomach cancer were observed. Pneumoconiosis mortality was found to vary significantly by the rank of coal dust to which miners were exposed. Miners exposed at or below the current U.S. coal dust standard of 2 mg/m3 over a working lifetime, based on these analyses, have an elevated risk of dying from pneumoconiosis or from chronic bronchitis or emphysema.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Division of Standards Development and Technology Transfer, Cincinnati, OH, 45226, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Coal Mining
    Humans
    Life Tables
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Occupational Diseases
    Occupational Exposure
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Respiratory Tract Diseases
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    8585515

    Citation

    Kuempel, E D., et al. "Exposure-response Analysis of Mortality Among Coal Miners in the United States." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 28, no. 2, 1995, pp. 167-84.
    Kuempel ED, Stayner LT, Attfield MD, et al. Exposure-response analysis of mortality among coal miners in the United States. Am J Ind Med. 1995;28(2):167-84.
    Kuempel, E. D., Stayner, L. T., Attfield, M. D., & Buncher, C. R. (1995). Exposure-response analysis of mortality among coal miners in the United States. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 28(2), pp. 167-84.
    Kuempel ED, et al. Exposure-response Analysis of Mortality Among Coal Miners in the United States. Am J Ind Med. 1995;28(2):167-84. PubMed PMID: 8585515.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure-response analysis of mortality among coal miners in the United States. AU - Kuempel,E D, AU - Stayner,L T, AU - Attfield,M D, AU - Buncher,C R, PY - 1995/8/1/pubmed PY - 1995/8/1/medline PY - 1995/8/1/entrez SP - 167 EP - 84 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am. J. Ind. Med. VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - The quantitative relationship between exposure to respirable coal mine dust and mortality from nonmalignant respiratory diseases was investigated in a study of 8,878 working male coal miners who were medically examined from 1969 to 1971 and followed to 1979. Exposure-related mortality was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards modeling for underlying or contributing causes of death and modified lifetable methods for underlying causes. For pneumoconiosis mortality, the lifetable analyses showed increasing standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) with increasing cumulative exposure category. Significant exposure-response relationships for mortality from pneumoconiosis (p < 0.001) and from chronic bronchitis or emphysema (p < 0.05) were observed in the proportional hazards models after controlling for age and smoking. No exposure-related increases in lung cancer or stomach cancer were observed. Pneumoconiosis mortality was found to vary significantly by the rank of coal dust to which miners were exposed. Miners exposed at or below the current U.S. coal dust standard of 2 mg/m3 over a working lifetime, based on these analyses, have an elevated risk of dying from pneumoconiosis or from chronic bronchitis or emphysema. SN - 0271-3586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8585515/Exposure_response_analysis_of_mortality_among_coal_miners_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0271-3586&amp;date=1995&amp;volume=28&amp;issue=2&amp;spage=167 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -