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A new intralesional therapy of cutaneous leishmaniasis with hypertonic sodium chloride solution.
J Dermatol. 1995 Oct; 22(10):732-7.JD

Abstract

One hundred and fifty-eight lesions of acute cutaneous leishmaniasis in 70 patients were treated with hypertonic sodium chloride solution "HSCS" (88 lesions) or sodium stibogluconate (50 lesions); 20 lesions were left untreated as controls. The injections were given at 7-10 day intervals, and patients were followed-up for 42 days. "HSCS" was shown to be a very effective local therapy (96.05% cure rate) and was as effective as local sodium stibogluconate (96.42% cure rate). With both types of therapy, most lesions needed only one injection. Mild improvement was noticed 7-10 days after the first injection, and the cure was complete within 2-6 weeks (mean 4 weeks) of follow-up. None of the control lesions showed a cure within the six weeks follow-up. The mechanisms of action of both "HSCS" and sodium stibogluconate probably involve interference with the osmotic pressure of the cell cytoplasm of the parasites and lesional tissues. Scarring was either absent or minimal following healing of the treated lesions with both types of treatment. Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation was observed in all patients. We strongly recommend intralesional "HSCS" as a cheap, safe, and effective local method for treating cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Iraq.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8586751

Citation

Sharquie, K E.. "A New Intralesional Therapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis With Hypertonic Sodium Chloride Solution." The Journal of Dermatology, vol. 22, no. 10, 1995, pp. 732-7.
Sharquie KE. A new intralesional therapy of cutaneous leishmaniasis with hypertonic sodium chloride solution. J Dermatol. 1995;22(10):732-7.
Sharquie, K. E. (1995). A new intralesional therapy of cutaneous leishmaniasis with hypertonic sodium chloride solution. The Journal of Dermatology, 22(10), 732-7.
Sharquie KE. A New Intralesional Therapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis With Hypertonic Sodium Chloride Solution. J Dermatol. 1995;22(10):732-7. PubMed PMID: 8586751.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A new intralesional therapy of cutaneous leishmaniasis with hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A1 - Sharquie,K E, PY - 1995/10/1/pubmed PY - 1995/10/1/medline PY - 1995/10/1/entrez SP - 732 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of dermatology JO - J Dermatol VL - 22 IS - 10 N2 - One hundred and fifty-eight lesions of acute cutaneous leishmaniasis in 70 patients were treated with hypertonic sodium chloride solution "HSCS" (88 lesions) or sodium stibogluconate (50 lesions); 20 lesions were left untreated as controls. The injections were given at 7-10 day intervals, and patients were followed-up for 42 days. "HSCS" was shown to be a very effective local therapy (96.05% cure rate) and was as effective as local sodium stibogluconate (96.42% cure rate). With both types of therapy, most lesions needed only one injection. Mild improvement was noticed 7-10 days after the first injection, and the cure was complete within 2-6 weeks (mean 4 weeks) of follow-up. None of the control lesions showed a cure within the six weeks follow-up. The mechanisms of action of both "HSCS" and sodium stibogluconate probably involve interference with the osmotic pressure of the cell cytoplasm of the parasites and lesional tissues. Scarring was either absent or minimal following healing of the treated lesions with both types of treatment. Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation was observed in all patients. We strongly recommend intralesional "HSCS" as a cheap, safe, and effective local method for treating cutaneous leishmaniasis. SN - 0385-2407 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8586751/A_new_intralesional_therapy_of_cutaneous_leishmaniasis_with_hypertonic_sodium_chloride_solution_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0385-2407&date=1995&volume=22&issue=10&spage=732 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -