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Effects of a one-year high-intensity versus low-intensity resistance training program on bone mineral density in older women.
J Bone Miner Res 1995; 10(11):1788-95JB

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-month resistance training program, of two different intensities, on bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy, older women. Twenty-six Caucasian women (aged 65-79 years) completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: high-intensity (HI; n = 8), low-intensity (LI; n = 7), and control (CON; n = 11). The active groups performed 10 exercises, 3 days/week under supervision. Exercise intensity was maintained at 80% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) for the HI groups, and at 40% 1-RM for the LI group. The volume of work was maintained constant between the two groups by assigning the LI group twice as many repetitions for each exercise. Maximal muscular strength and BMD of the lumbar spine and total hip were measured at baseline and at 12 months. Strength was evaluated using the 1-RM method, and BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Exercise session attendance was similar for the two groups (81.0% HI; 76.8% LI). Muscular strength improved in the exercisers compared with the CON group (p < or = 0.05). Percentage change in lumbar spine BMD was 0.7 +/- 1.9%, 0.5 +/- 2.4%, and -0.1 +/- 2.3% for the HI, LI, and CON groups, respectively. Percentage change in total hip BMD was 0.8 +/- 2.3% (HI), 1.0 +/- 1.7% (LI), and 0.9 +/- 1.3% (CON). Group differences in BMD change were not significant (p > 0.05). These findings suggest that high-intensity and low-intensity resistance training regimens effectively increase muscular strength, but not lumbar spine or total hip BMD, in healthy, older women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Palo Alto, California, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8592957

Citation

Pruitt, L A., et al. "Effects of a One-year High-intensity Versus Low-intensity Resistance Training Program On Bone Mineral Density in Older Women." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 10, no. 11, 1995, pp. 1788-95.
Pruitt LA, Taaffe DR, Marcus R. Effects of a one-year high-intensity versus low-intensity resistance training program on bone mineral density in older women. J Bone Miner Res. 1995;10(11):1788-95.
Pruitt, L. A., Taaffe, D. R., & Marcus, R. (1995). Effects of a one-year high-intensity versus low-intensity resistance training program on bone mineral density in older women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 10(11), pp. 1788-95.
Pruitt LA, Taaffe DR, Marcus R. Effects of a One-year High-intensity Versus Low-intensity Resistance Training Program On Bone Mineral Density in Older Women. J Bone Miner Res. 1995;10(11):1788-95. PubMed PMID: 8592957.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a one-year high-intensity versus low-intensity resistance training program on bone mineral density in older women. AU - Pruitt,L A, AU - Taaffe,D R, AU - Marcus,R, PY - 1995/11/1/pubmed PY - 1995/11/1/medline PY - 1995/11/1/entrez SP - 1788 EP - 95 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 10 IS - 11 N2 - The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-month resistance training program, of two different intensities, on bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy, older women. Twenty-six Caucasian women (aged 65-79 years) completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: high-intensity (HI; n = 8), low-intensity (LI; n = 7), and control (CON; n = 11). The active groups performed 10 exercises, 3 days/week under supervision. Exercise intensity was maintained at 80% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) for the HI groups, and at 40% 1-RM for the LI group. The volume of work was maintained constant between the two groups by assigning the LI group twice as many repetitions for each exercise. Maximal muscular strength and BMD of the lumbar spine and total hip were measured at baseline and at 12 months. Strength was evaluated using the 1-RM method, and BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Exercise session attendance was similar for the two groups (81.0% HI; 76.8% LI). Muscular strength improved in the exercisers compared with the CON group (p < or = 0.05). Percentage change in lumbar spine BMD was 0.7 +/- 1.9%, 0.5 +/- 2.4%, and -0.1 +/- 2.3% for the HI, LI, and CON groups, respectively. Percentage change in total hip BMD was 0.8 +/- 2.3% (HI), 1.0 +/- 1.7% (LI), and 0.9 +/- 1.3% (CON). Group differences in BMD change were not significant (p > 0.05). These findings suggest that high-intensity and low-intensity resistance training regimens effectively increase muscular strength, but not lumbar spine or total hip BMD, in healthy, older women. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8592957/Effects_of_a_one_year_high_intensity_versus_low_intensity_resistance_training_program_on_bone_mineral_density_in_older_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.5650101123 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -