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Relationship between dietary intake and coronary heart disease mortality: lipid research clinics prevalence follow-up study.
J Clin Epidemiol 1996; 49(2):211-6JC

Abstract

The diet-heart hypothesis proposes that elevated intakes of total fat, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol raise serum cholesterol, which in turn increases the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). To examine the relationship between dietary intake and 12-year CHD mortality we used data from the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Follow-Up Study. Dietary intake was measured at study entry using the 24-hour recall technique among 4546 North American men and women who were at least 30 years old and initially free of CHD. Proportional hazards analyses controlling for total energy intake indicated that increasing percentages of energy intake as total fat (RR 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08), saturated fat (RR 1.11, CI = 1.04-1.18), and monounsaturated fat (RR 1.08, CI = 1.01-1.16) were significant risk factors for CHD mortality among 30 to 59 year olds. The increasing percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate had a significant protective effect (RR 0.96, CI = 0.94-0.99). The strength of these associations was not diminished after adjustment for specific serum lipids, suggesting that serum lipids did not mediate the effect of diet on CHD mortality. None of the dietary components were significantly associated with CHD mortality among those aged 60-79 years. We conclude that future research must be directed toward better understanding the pathway between dietary intake and coronary disease as the current diet-lipid-heart hypothesis may be overly simplistic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre For the Analysis of Cost-Effective Care, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8606322

Citation

Esrey, K L., et al. "Relationship Between Dietary Intake and Coronary Heart Disease Mortality: Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Follow-up Study." Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 49, no. 2, 1996, pp. 211-6.
Esrey KL, Joseph L, Grover SA. Relationship between dietary intake and coronary heart disease mortality: lipid research clinics prevalence follow-up study. J Clin Epidemiol. 1996;49(2):211-6.
Esrey, K. L., Joseph, L., & Grover, S. A. (1996). Relationship between dietary intake and coronary heart disease mortality: lipid research clinics prevalence follow-up study. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 49(2), pp. 211-6.
Esrey KL, Joseph L, Grover SA. Relationship Between Dietary Intake and Coronary Heart Disease Mortality: Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Follow-up Study. J Clin Epidemiol. 1996;49(2):211-6. PubMed PMID: 8606322.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between dietary intake and coronary heart disease mortality: lipid research clinics prevalence follow-up study. AU - Esrey,K L, AU - Joseph,L, AU - Grover,S A, PY - 1996/2/1/pubmed PY - 1996/2/1/medline PY - 1996/2/1/entrez SP - 211 EP - 6 JF - Journal of clinical epidemiology JO - J Clin Epidemiol VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - The diet-heart hypothesis proposes that elevated intakes of total fat, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol raise serum cholesterol, which in turn increases the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). To examine the relationship between dietary intake and 12-year CHD mortality we used data from the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Follow-Up Study. Dietary intake was measured at study entry using the 24-hour recall technique among 4546 North American men and women who were at least 30 years old and initially free of CHD. Proportional hazards analyses controlling for total energy intake indicated that increasing percentages of energy intake as total fat (RR 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08), saturated fat (RR 1.11, CI = 1.04-1.18), and monounsaturated fat (RR 1.08, CI = 1.01-1.16) were significant risk factors for CHD mortality among 30 to 59 year olds. The increasing percentage of energy intake from carbohydrate had a significant protective effect (RR 0.96, CI = 0.94-0.99). The strength of these associations was not diminished after adjustment for specific serum lipids, suggesting that serum lipids did not mediate the effect of diet on CHD mortality. None of the dietary components were significantly associated with CHD mortality among those aged 60-79 years. We conclude that future research must be directed toward better understanding the pathway between dietary intake and coronary disease as the current diet-lipid-heart hypothesis may be overly simplistic. SN - 0895-4356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8606322/Relationship_between_dietary_intake_and_coronary_heart_disease_mortality:_lipid_research_clinics_prevalence_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0895-4356(95)00066-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -