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Effects of a behavioral weight loss program stressing calorie restriction versus calorie plus fat restriction in obese individuals with NIDDM or a family history of diabetes.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the effects of a behavioral intervention focusing on either calorie restriction alone or calorie plus fat restriction on weight loss and changes in lipids and glycemic control in individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or a family history of diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

We recruited 44 obese women with NIDDM and 46 obese women with a family history of NIDDM and randomly assigned these subjects to calorie restriction (CAL) or to calorie plus fat restriction (CAL + FAT). All subjects participated in a 16-week behavioral weight loss program, with training in diet, exercise, and behavior modification. Subjects assigned to the CAL condition were given a 1,000-1,500 kcal/day goal and self-monitored calories consumed. Subjects assigned to the CAL+FAT condition had the same calorie goal, but were also given a fat goal (grams of fat/day), to produce a diet with < 20% of calories from fat; this group monitored both calories and fat grams.

RESULTS

Among NIDDM subjects, weight loss of the subjects in the CAL+FAT condition was significantly greater than subjects in the CAL condition (7.7 vs. 4.6 kg) and the CAL+FAT condition group also maintained their weight loss better at the 1-year follow-up (5.2 vs. 1.0 kg). Significant decreases in glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and total cholesterol were seen after 16 weeks of treatment among NIDDM subjects; these changes were similar in CAL and CAL+FAT groups, but a greater proportion of subjects in CAL condition required oral hypoglycemic medication. At the 1-year follow-up, all parameters had returned to baseline. No significant differences in weight loss or physiological changes were seen between CAL and CAL+FAT conditions in subjects with a family history of diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that using the combination of calorie and fat restriction may help promote weight loss in obese NIDDM patients. No other long-term benefits of this regimen were observed.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    Diabetes care 18:9 1995 Sep pg 1241-8

    MeSH

    Behavior Therapy
    Blood Glucose
    Body Mass Index
    Cholesterol
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Diabetes Mellitus
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Diabetic Angiopathies
    Diet, Diabetic
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Diet, Reducing
    Exercise
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Glycated Hemoglobin A
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Self Care
    Time Factors
    Triglycerides
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    8612437

    Citation

    Pascale, R W., et al. "Effects of a Behavioral Weight Loss Program Stressing Calorie Restriction Versus Calorie Plus Fat Restriction in Obese Individuals With NIDDM or a Family History of Diabetes." Diabetes Care, vol. 18, no. 9, 1995, pp. 1241-8.
    Pascale RW, Wing RR, Butler BA, et al. Effects of a behavioral weight loss program stressing calorie restriction versus calorie plus fat restriction in obese individuals with NIDDM or a family history of diabetes. Diabetes Care. 1995;18(9):1241-8.
    Pascale, R. W., Wing, R. R., Butler, B. A., Mullen, M., & Bononi, P. (1995). Effects of a behavioral weight loss program stressing calorie restriction versus calorie plus fat restriction in obese individuals with NIDDM or a family history of diabetes. Diabetes Care, 18(9), pp. 1241-8.
    Pascale RW, et al. Effects of a Behavioral Weight Loss Program Stressing Calorie Restriction Versus Calorie Plus Fat Restriction in Obese Individuals With NIDDM or a Family History of Diabetes. Diabetes Care. 1995;18(9):1241-8. PubMed PMID: 8612437.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a behavioral weight loss program stressing calorie restriction versus calorie plus fat restriction in obese individuals with NIDDM or a family history of diabetes. AU - Pascale,R W, AU - Wing,R R, AU - Butler,B A, AU - Mullen,M, AU - Bononi,P, PY - 1995/9/1/pubmed PY - 1995/9/1/medline PY - 1995/9/1/entrez SP - 1241 EP - 8 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 18 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the effects of a behavioral intervention focusing on either calorie restriction alone or calorie plus fat restriction on weight loss and changes in lipids and glycemic control in individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or a family history of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We recruited 44 obese women with NIDDM and 46 obese women with a family history of NIDDM and randomly assigned these subjects to calorie restriction (CAL) or to calorie plus fat restriction (CAL + FAT). All subjects participated in a 16-week behavioral weight loss program, with training in diet, exercise, and behavior modification. Subjects assigned to the CAL condition were given a 1,000-1,500 kcal/day goal and self-monitored calories consumed. Subjects assigned to the CAL+FAT condition had the same calorie goal, but were also given a fat goal (grams of fat/day), to produce a diet with < 20% of calories from fat; this group monitored both calories and fat grams. RESULTS: Among NIDDM subjects, weight loss of the subjects in the CAL+FAT condition was significantly greater than subjects in the CAL condition (7.7 vs. 4.6 kg) and the CAL+FAT condition group also maintained their weight loss better at the 1-year follow-up (5.2 vs. 1.0 kg). Significant decreases in glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and total cholesterol were seen after 16 weeks of treatment among NIDDM subjects; these changes were similar in CAL and CAL+FAT groups, but a greater proportion of subjects in CAL condition required oral hypoglycemic medication. At the 1-year follow-up, all parameters had returned to baseline. No significant differences in weight loss or physiological changes were seen between CAL and CAL+FAT conditions in subjects with a family history of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that using the combination of calorie and fat restriction may help promote weight loss in obese NIDDM patients. No other long-term benefits of this regimen were observed. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8612437/Effects_of_a_behavioral_weight_loss_program_stressing_calorie_restriction_versus_calorie_plus_fat_restriction_in_obese_individuals_with_NIDDM_or_a_family_history_of_diabetes_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=8612437.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -