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Transmission of HIV-1 in the breast-feeding process.
J Am Diet Assoc 1996; 96(3):267-74; quiz 275-6JA

Abstract

Current laboratory techniques cannot distinguish the mode of vertical transmission (intrauterine, intrapartum, or postnatal) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from mother to infant. The ability to transmit HIV-1 via breast feeding has been established in 24 case reports, primarily involving mothers who seroconvert after delivery. Whether breast-feeding adds a notable additional risk of HIV-1 infection to the risk from pregnancy is controversial. The importance of the duration and intensity of breast-feeding in modulating the outcome of HIV transmission via breast milk also remains unclear. Factors in breast milk may play important roles in an infant's susceptibility to infection with HIV and in the expression of the virus. Pasteurization and storage enhance the intrinsic, antiviral properties of human milk. Banked human milk is pasteurized to destroy the HIV-1 virus but retains properties that may be helpful to infants of HIV-1-positive mothers in developed countries where breast-feeding is not recommended. For infants in populations where the infant mortality rate is high, the risk of death associated with HIV infection acquired via breast milk is lower than the risk associated with not being breast-fed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Augusta Nutrition Consultants, Augusta, Georgia, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8613662

Citation

Black, R F.. "Transmission of HIV-1 in the Breast-feeding Process." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 96, no. 3, 1996, pp. 267-74; quiz 275-6.
Black RF. Transmission of HIV-1 in the breast-feeding process. J Am Diet Assoc. 1996;96(3):267-74; quiz 275-6.
Black, R. F. (1996). Transmission of HIV-1 in the breast-feeding process. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 96(3), pp. 267-74; quiz 275-6.
Black RF. Transmission of HIV-1 in the Breast-feeding Process. J Am Diet Assoc. 1996;96(3):267-74; quiz 275-6. PubMed PMID: 8613662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transmission of HIV-1 in the breast-feeding process. A1 - Black,R F, PY - 1996/3/1/pubmed PY - 1996/3/1/medline PY - 1996/3/1/entrez KW - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome--transmission KW - Age Factors KW - Biology KW - Breast Feeding KW - Demographic Factors KW - Diseases KW - Health KW - Hiv Infections--transmission KW - Human Milk KW - Infant KW - Infant Mortality KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Lactation KW - Maternal Physiology KW - Mortality KW - Nutrition KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Risk Factors KW - Vertical Transmission KW - Viral Diseases KW - Youth SP - 267-74; quiz 275-6 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 96 IS - 3 N2 - Current laboratory techniques cannot distinguish the mode of vertical transmission (intrauterine, intrapartum, or postnatal) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from mother to infant. The ability to transmit HIV-1 via breast feeding has been established in 24 case reports, primarily involving mothers who seroconvert after delivery. Whether breast-feeding adds a notable additional risk of HIV-1 infection to the risk from pregnancy is controversial. The importance of the duration and intensity of breast-feeding in modulating the outcome of HIV transmission via breast milk also remains unclear. Factors in breast milk may play important roles in an infant's susceptibility to infection with HIV and in the expression of the virus. Pasteurization and storage enhance the intrinsic, antiviral properties of human milk. Banked human milk is pasteurized to destroy the HIV-1 virus but retains properties that may be helpful to infants of HIV-1-positive mothers in developed countries where breast-feeding is not recommended. For infants in populations where the infant mortality rate is high, the risk of death associated with HIV infection acquired via breast milk is lower than the risk associated with not being breast-fed. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8613662/Transmission_of_HIV_1_in_the_breast_feeding_process_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(96)00079-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -