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A prospective study of the intake of vitamins C and B6, and the risk of kidney stones in men.

Abstract

PURPOSE

The association between the intake of vitamins C and B6, and kidney stone formation was examined.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We conducted a prospective study of the relationship between the intake of vitamins C and B6 and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones in a cohort of 45,251 men 40 to 75 years old with no history of kidney calculi. Vitamin intake from foods and supplements was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire completed in 1986.

RESULTS

During 6 years of followup 751 incident cases of kidney stones were documented. Neither vitamin C nor vitamin B6 intake was significantly associated with the risk of stone formation. For vitamin C the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 1,500 mg. daily or more compared to less than 250 mg. daily was 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 1.11). For vitamin B6 the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 40 mg. daily or more compared to less than 3 mg. daily was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.31). After adjusting for other potential stone risk factors the relative risks did not change significantly.

CONCLUSIONS

These data do not support an association between a high daily intake of vitamin C or vitamin B6 and the risk of stone formation, even when consumed in large doses.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    The Journal of urology 155:6 1996 Jun pg 1847-51

    MeSH

    Ascorbic Acid
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Energy Intake
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Incidence
    Kidney Calculi
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Pyridoxine
    Risk Factors
    Time Factors
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    8618271

    Citation

    Curhan, G C., et al. "A Prospective Study of the Intake of Vitamins C and B6, and the Risk of Kidney Stones in Men." The Journal of Urology, vol. 155, no. 6, 1996, pp. 1847-51.
    Curhan GC, Willett WC, Rimm EB, et al. A prospective study of the intake of vitamins C and B6, and the risk of kidney stones in men. J Urol. 1996;155(6):1847-51.
    Curhan, G. C., Willett, W. C., Rimm, E. B., & Stampfer, M. J. (1996). A prospective study of the intake of vitamins C and B6, and the risk of kidney stones in men. The Journal of Urology, 155(6), pp. 1847-51.
    Curhan GC, et al. A Prospective Study of the Intake of Vitamins C and B6, and the Risk of Kidney Stones in Men. J Urol. 1996;155(6):1847-51. PubMed PMID: 8618271.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of the intake of vitamins C and B6, and the risk of kidney stones in men. AU - Curhan,G C, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Stampfer,M J, PY - 1996/6/1/pubmed PY - 1996/6/1/medline PY - 1996/6/1/entrez SP - 1847 EP - 51 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 155 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: The association between the intake of vitamins C and B6, and kidney stone formation was examined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of the relationship between the intake of vitamins C and B6 and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones in a cohort of 45,251 men 40 to 75 years old with no history of kidney calculi. Vitamin intake from foods and supplements was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire completed in 1986. RESULTS: During 6 years of followup 751 incident cases of kidney stones were documented. Neither vitamin C nor vitamin B6 intake was significantly associated with the risk of stone formation. For vitamin C the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 1,500 mg. daily or more compared to less than 250 mg. daily was 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 1.11). For vitamin B6 the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 40 mg. daily or more compared to less than 3 mg. daily was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.31). After adjusting for other potential stone risk factors the relative risks did not change significantly. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support an association between a high daily intake of vitamin C or vitamin B6 and the risk of stone formation, even when consumed in large doses. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8618271/A_prospective_study_of_the_intake_of_vitamins_C_and_B6_and_the_risk_of_kidney_stones_in_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-5347(01)66027-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -