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Weight change between age 50 years and old age is associated with risk of hip fracture in white women aged 67 years and older.
Arch Intern Med. 1996 May 13; 156(9):989-94.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although changes in body weight with aging are common, little is known about the effects of weight change on health in old age.

OBJECTIVES

To study the effects of weight loss and weight gain from age 50 years to old age on the risk of hip fracture among postmenopausal white women aged 67 years and older and to determine if the level of weight at age 50 years modifies this risk.

METHODS

The association between weight change and the risk of hip fracture was studied in 3683 community-dwelling white women aged 67 years and older from three sites of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly.

RESULTS

Extreme weight loss (10% or more) beginning at age 50 years was associated in a proportional hazards model with increased risk of hip fracture (relative risk [RR], 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.1). This risk was greatest among women in the lowest (RR, 2.3; CI, 1.1-4.8) and middle (RR, 2.8; CI, 1.5-5.3) tertiles of body mass index at age 50 years. Among the thinnest women, even more modest weight loss (5% to < 10%) was associated with increased risk of hip fracture (RR, 2.3; CI, 1.0-5.2). Weight gain of 10% or more beginning at age 50 years provided borderline protection against the risk of hip fracture (RR, 0.7; CI, 0.4-1.0). The RRs for weight gain of 10% or more were protective only among women in the middle and high tertiles of body mass index at age 50 years and were not significant (middle tertile RR, 0.8; CI, 0.3-1.8; high tertile RR, 0.6; CI, 0.2-1.9).

CONCLUSIONS

Weight history is an important determinant of the risk of hip fracture. Weight loss beginning at age 50 years increases the risk of hip fracture in older white women, especially among those who are thin at age 50 years; weight gain of 10% or more decreases the risk of hip fracture. Physicians should include weight history in their assessment of postmenopausal older women for risk of hip fracture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Md, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8624179

Citation

Langlois, J A., et al. "Weight Change Between Age 50 Years and Old Age Is Associated With Risk of Hip Fracture in White Women Aged 67 Years and Older." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 156, no. 9, 1996, pp. 989-94.
Langlois JA, Harris T, Looker AC, et al. Weight change between age 50 years and old age is associated with risk of hip fracture in white women aged 67 years and older. Arch Intern Med. 1996;156(9):989-94.
Langlois, J. A., Harris, T., Looker, A. C., & Madans, J. (1996). Weight change between age 50 years and old age is associated with risk of hip fracture in white women aged 67 years and older. Archives of Internal Medicine, 156(9), 989-94.
Langlois JA, et al. Weight Change Between Age 50 Years and Old Age Is Associated With Risk of Hip Fracture in White Women Aged 67 Years and Older. Arch Intern Med. 1996 May 13;156(9):989-94. PubMed PMID: 8624179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight change between age 50 years and old age is associated with risk of hip fracture in white women aged 67 years and older. AU - Langlois,J A, AU - Harris,T, AU - Looker,A C, AU - Madans,J, PY - 1996/5/13/pubmed PY - 1996/5/13/medline PY - 1996/5/13/entrez SP - 989 EP - 94 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 156 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although changes in body weight with aging are common, little is known about the effects of weight change on health in old age. OBJECTIVES: To study the effects of weight loss and weight gain from age 50 years to old age on the risk of hip fracture among postmenopausal white women aged 67 years and older and to determine if the level of weight at age 50 years modifies this risk. METHODS: The association between weight change and the risk of hip fracture was studied in 3683 community-dwelling white women aged 67 years and older from three sites of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly. RESULTS: Extreme weight loss (10% or more) beginning at age 50 years was associated in a proportional hazards model with increased risk of hip fracture (relative risk [RR], 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.1). This risk was greatest among women in the lowest (RR, 2.3; CI, 1.1-4.8) and middle (RR, 2.8; CI, 1.5-5.3) tertiles of body mass index at age 50 years. Among the thinnest women, even more modest weight loss (5% to < 10%) was associated with increased risk of hip fracture (RR, 2.3; CI, 1.0-5.2). Weight gain of 10% or more beginning at age 50 years provided borderline protection against the risk of hip fracture (RR, 0.7; CI, 0.4-1.0). The RRs for weight gain of 10% or more were protective only among women in the middle and high tertiles of body mass index at age 50 years and were not significant (middle tertile RR, 0.8; CI, 0.3-1.8; high tertile RR, 0.6; CI, 0.2-1.9). CONCLUSIONS: Weight history is an important determinant of the risk of hip fracture. Weight loss beginning at age 50 years increases the risk of hip fracture in older white women, especially among those who are thin at age 50 years; weight gain of 10% or more decreases the risk of hip fracture. Physicians should include weight history in their assessment of postmenopausal older women for risk of hip fracture. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8624179/Weight_change_between_age_50_years_and_old_age_is_associated_with_risk_of_hip_fracture_in_white_women_aged_67_years_and_older_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/156/pg/989 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -