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Pediatric care for children whose parents are gay or lesbian.
Pediatrics. 1996 May; 97(5):629-35.Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A growing number of children have at least one parent who is gay or lesbian. There is no evidence that these children experience any particular difficulties as a result of their parents' sexual orientation. Considerable evidence suggests that the provision of health care may not address the special needs and concerns of gay men and lesbians adequately. No research has been done regarding the pediatric care of children whose parents are gay or lesbian. It is likely that there are predictable challenges and development transitions for these children and parents for which pediatricians and other health care providers might be helpful advisers.

OBJECTIVE

This exploratory project sought to describe the experiences that lesbian and gay parents and their children have had with the pediatric health care system. We were interested in describing experiences that had been especially affirming and others that had been troublesome and in gathering suggestions regarding changes in the structure and process of care.

METHODOLOGY

Two hundred fifty-five parents completed an open-ended questionnaire. Responses were coded and tabulated.

RESULTS

Most parents described considerable success in obtaining pediatric care that was affirming, supportive, and satisfactory. On the other hand, many parents noted deficiencies in pediatric offices, clinics, emergency departments, and hospitals, many of which could be corrected easily.

CONCLUSIONS

We have summarized the accumulated advice to pediatric health care providers and have described some of the developmental transitions that are potentially appropriate opportunities for pediatric intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester., 01655-0001, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8628598

Citation

Perrin, E C., and H Kulkin. "Pediatric Care for Children Whose Parents Are Gay or Lesbian." Pediatrics, vol. 97, no. 5, 1996, pp. 629-35.
Perrin EC, Kulkin H. Pediatric care for children whose parents are gay or lesbian. Pediatrics. 1996;97(5):629-35.
Perrin, E. C., & Kulkin, H. (1996). Pediatric care for children whose parents are gay or lesbian. Pediatrics, 97(5), 629-35.
Perrin EC, Kulkin H. Pediatric Care for Children Whose Parents Are Gay or Lesbian. Pediatrics. 1996;97(5):629-35. PubMed PMID: 8628598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric care for children whose parents are gay or lesbian. AU - Perrin,E C, AU - Kulkin,H, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 629 EP - 35 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 97 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: A growing number of children have at least one parent who is gay or lesbian. There is no evidence that these children experience any particular difficulties as a result of their parents' sexual orientation. Considerable evidence suggests that the provision of health care may not address the special needs and concerns of gay men and lesbians adequately. No research has been done regarding the pediatric care of children whose parents are gay or lesbian. It is likely that there are predictable challenges and development transitions for these children and parents for which pediatricians and other health care providers might be helpful advisers. OBJECTIVE: This exploratory project sought to describe the experiences that lesbian and gay parents and their children have had with the pediatric health care system. We were interested in describing experiences that had been especially affirming and others that had been troublesome and in gathering suggestions regarding changes in the structure and process of care. METHODOLOGY: Two hundred fifty-five parents completed an open-ended questionnaire. Responses were coded and tabulated. RESULTS: Most parents described considerable success in obtaining pediatric care that was affirming, supportive, and satisfactory. On the other hand, many parents noted deficiencies in pediatric offices, clinics, emergency departments, and hospitals, many of which could be corrected easily. CONCLUSIONS: We have summarized the accumulated advice to pediatric health care providers and have described some of the developmental transitions that are potentially appropriate opportunities for pediatric intervention. SN - 0031-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8628598/Pediatric_care_for_children_whose_parents_are_gay_or_lesbian_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=8628598 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -