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Symptom duration in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.
Am J Gastroenterol. 1996 May; 91(5):898-905.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The etiology and natural history of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood. We compared rectal sensory thresholds and compliance, SCL-90 scores, and follow-up questionnaires among normal controls, patients with longstanding (> 5 y) disease (L-IBS), and patients with recent onset (> 2 y) disease (R-IBS). The onset of symptoms in R-IBS was related to specific events such as infection (n = 10), surgery (n = 5), and stress (n = 4), but no specific event could be identified in six patients.

METHODS

A diagnosis of IBS was made using Manning criteria (> or = 3) and clinical grounds. Psychological data were obtained by psychometrics (SCL-90) scores. Rectal wall compliance and thresholds for the sensation of stool and discomfort were evaluated using the electronic barostat.

RESULTS

The mean thresholds for phasic and ramp distention were similar for R-IBS and L-IBS groups for the perception of stool and discomfort. When compared with normals, the mean stool thresholds for phasic distention were significantly lower for L-IBS and R-IBS groups. SCL-90 scores were significantly increased in L-IBS in the mean phobia score (45 R-IBS vs 61 L-IBS), anxiety score (49 R-IBS vs 63 L-IBS), paranoia score (44 R-IBS vs 60 L-IBS), and hostility score (47 R-IBS vs 61 L-IBS) (all p < 0.05). On follow-up questionnaire, 60% of R-IBS versus 46% of L-IBS patients indicated that their symptoms had improved (p < 0.05). R-IBS patients also experienced fewer episodes of abdominal pain per week at follow-up than L-IBS patients (3.9 +/- 1.0 vs 8.5 +/- 1.7, respectively) (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that IBS patients with short symptom duration and fewer psychological symptoms have a better prognosis than patients with a long history of IBS and associated psychological distress, although long term prospective studies are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VA/UCLA CURE Gastroenteric Biology Center, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8633578

Citation

Lembo, T, et al. "Symptom Duration in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 91, no. 5, 1996, pp. 898-905.
Lembo T, Fullerton S, Diehl D, et al. Symptom duration in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 1996;91(5):898-905.
Lembo, T., Fullerton, S., Diehl, D., Raeen, H., Munakata, J., Naliboff, B., & Mayer, E. A. (1996). Symptom duration in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 91(5), 898-905.
Lembo T, et al. Symptom Duration in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 1996;91(5):898-905. PubMed PMID: 8633578.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptom duration in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Lembo,T, AU - Fullerton,S, AU - Diehl,D, AU - Raeen,H, AU - Munakata,J, AU - Naliboff,B, AU - Mayer,E A, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 898 EP - 905 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 91 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The etiology and natural history of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood. We compared rectal sensory thresholds and compliance, SCL-90 scores, and follow-up questionnaires among normal controls, patients with longstanding (> 5 y) disease (L-IBS), and patients with recent onset (> 2 y) disease (R-IBS). The onset of symptoms in R-IBS was related to specific events such as infection (n = 10), surgery (n = 5), and stress (n = 4), but no specific event could be identified in six patients. METHODS: A diagnosis of IBS was made using Manning criteria (> or = 3) and clinical grounds. Psychological data were obtained by psychometrics (SCL-90) scores. Rectal wall compliance and thresholds for the sensation of stool and discomfort were evaluated using the electronic barostat. RESULTS: The mean thresholds for phasic and ramp distention were similar for R-IBS and L-IBS groups for the perception of stool and discomfort. When compared with normals, the mean stool thresholds for phasic distention were significantly lower for L-IBS and R-IBS groups. SCL-90 scores were significantly increased in L-IBS in the mean phobia score (45 R-IBS vs 61 L-IBS), anxiety score (49 R-IBS vs 63 L-IBS), paranoia score (44 R-IBS vs 60 L-IBS), and hostility score (47 R-IBS vs 61 L-IBS) (all p < 0.05). On follow-up questionnaire, 60% of R-IBS versus 46% of L-IBS patients indicated that their symptoms had improved (p < 0.05). R-IBS patients also experienced fewer episodes of abdominal pain per week at follow-up than L-IBS patients (3.9 +/- 1.0 vs 8.5 +/- 1.7, respectively) (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that IBS patients with short symptom duration and fewer psychological symptoms have a better prognosis than patients with a long history of IBS and associated psychological distress, although long term prospective studies are needed. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8633578/Symptom_duration_in_patients_with_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3876 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -