Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Antiepileptic medication and oral contraceptive interactions: a national survey of neurologists and obstetricians.
Neurology. 1996 Jun; 46(6):1534-9.Neur

Abstract

Hepatic enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lower oral contraceptive (OC) sex hormone levels approximately 40% and increase the risk of unplanned pregnancies in women with epilepsy. AEDs also increase the risk of birth defects in offspring of women with epilepsy. We performed a national survey to determine obstetricians' and neurologists' knowledge of OC and AED interactions and the risk of birth defects for women with epilepsy taking AEDs. We received responses to a mailed questionnaire from 160 of 1,000 neurologists (16%) and 147 of 1,000 obstetricians (15%) from 47 states. Practice demographics and ages of responders were typical for U.S. neurologists and obstetricians. Ninety-one percent of neurologists and 75% of obstetricians said they treat women with epilepsy of child-bearing age. Only 4% of the neurologists and none of the obstetricians, however, knew the effects of the six most common AEDs on OCs, even though 27% of neurologists and 21% of obstetricians reported OC failures in their patients taking AEDs. Although increasing OC doses can compensate for insufficient OC sex hormone levels due to AEDs, most physicians do not increase the doses. Even though the risk of birth defects for the offspring of women with epilepsy is 4 to 6%, up from the background level of 2%, 44% of neurologists thought the risk was lower (0 to 3%), and some of the respondents guessed that it was as high as 50%. Many neurologists and obstetricians do not have accurate information to counsel women with epilepsy properly about their contraceptive and pregnancy choices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8649543

Citation

Krauss, G L., et al. "Antiepileptic Medication and Oral Contraceptive Interactions: a National Survey of Neurologists and Obstetricians." Neurology, vol. 46, no. 6, 1996, pp. 1534-9.
Krauss GL, Brandt J, Campbell M, et al. Antiepileptic medication and oral contraceptive interactions: a national survey of neurologists and obstetricians. Neurology. 1996;46(6):1534-9.
Krauss, G. L., Brandt, J., Campbell, M., Plate, C., & Summerfield, M. (1996). Antiepileptic medication and oral contraceptive interactions: a national survey of neurologists and obstetricians. Neurology, 46(6), 1534-9.
Krauss GL, et al. Antiepileptic Medication and Oral Contraceptive Interactions: a National Survey of Neurologists and Obstetricians. Neurology. 1996;46(6):1534-9. PubMed PMID: 8649543.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antiepileptic medication and oral contraceptive interactions: a national survey of neurologists and obstetricians. AU - Krauss,G L, AU - Brandt,J, AU - Campbell,M, AU - Plate,C, AU - Summerfield,M, PY - 1996/6/1/pubmed PY - 1996/6/1/medline PY - 1996/6/1/entrez KW - Americas KW - Biology KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Agents, Estrogen--administraction and dosage KW - Contraceptive Agents, Female--administraction and dosage KW - Contraceptive Agents--administraction and dosage KW - Contraceptive Methods--administraction and dosage KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Developed Countries KW - Drug Interactions KW - Drugs KW - Ethinyl Estradiol--administraction and dosage KW - Family Planning KW - Health KW - Health Personnel KW - Knowledge KW - Neurologic Effects KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Oral Contraceptives--administraction and dosage KW - Physicians KW - Physiology KW - Research Methodology KW - Sampling Studies KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - Treatment KW - United States SP - 1534 EP - 9 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 46 IS - 6 N2 - Hepatic enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lower oral contraceptive (OC) sex hormone levels approximately 40% and increase the risk of unplanned pregnancies in women with epilepsy. AEDs also increase the risk of birth defects in offspring of women with epilepsy. We performed a national survey to determine obstetricians' and neurologists' knowledge of OC and AED interactions and the risk of birth defects for women with epilepsy taking AEDs. We received responses to a mailed questionnaire from 160 of 1,000 neurologists (16%) and 147 of 1,000 obstetricians (15%) from 47 states. Practice demographics and ages of responders were typical for U.S. neurologists and obstetricians. Ninety-one percent of neurologists and 75% of obstetricians said they treat women with epilepsy of child-bearing age. Only 4% of the neurologists and none of the obstetricians, however, knew the effects of the six most common AEDs on OCs, even though 27% of neurologists and 21% of obstetricians reported OC failures in their patients taking AEDs. Although increasing OC doses can compensate for insufficient OC sex hormone levels due to AEDs, most physicians do not increase the doses. Even though the risk of birth defects for the offspring of women with epilepsy is 4 to 6%, up from the background level of 2%, 44% of neurologists thought the risk was lower (0 to 3%), and some of the respondents guessed that it was as high as 50%. Many neurologists and obstetricians do not have accurate information to counsel women with epilepsy properly about their contraceptive and pregnancy choices. SN - 0028-3878 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8649543/Antiepileptic_medication_and_oral_contraceptive_interactions:_a_national_survey_of_neurologists_and_obstetricians_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=8649543.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -