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Survey of anomalies in primary teeth and their correlation with the permanent dentition.
N Z Dent J. 1996 Mar; 92(407):4-8.NZ

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate primary and permanent tooth anomalies of 5-year-old children in Taranaki; 1,680 children were examined by school dental therapists, and the presence of hypodontia, hyperdontia, and double teeth recorded. Panoramic radiographs were taken of those children with anomalies of the primary teeth. Anomalies of the primary teeth were detected in 23 children (1.4 percent). Six children (3 boys and 3 girls) had hypodontia, 3 children (2 boys and 1 girl) had a supernumerary tooth, and 14 children (9 boys and 5 girls) had double teeth. Six of the affected teeth (in 4 boys and 2 girls) were diagnosed as fusion, and 8 (5 boys and 3 girls) as gemination. The panoramic radiographs of the 23 children with anomalies of the primary teeth revealed that 14 (60.9 percent) also had anomalies of the succedaneous permanent teeth. Children with hypodontia in the primary dentition all had corresponding permanent teeth missing. In all but three children, only one tooth was involved. Nineteen of the 30 primary teeth (63 percent) and 12 of the 15 permanent teeth (80 percent) affected by hypodontia, gemination, or fusion were lateral incisors. For each type of anomaly, boys were affected more often than girls. The results of the study confirm that, when there is hypodontia, hyperdontia, gemination, or fusion of teeth in the primary dentition, there is an increased likelihood of anomalies of the succedaneous permanent teeth. Because of this close relationship between the dentitions, early identification of anomalies of the primary teeth can allow the dentist to investigate further and plan for treatment at the appropriate time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Dental Health, School of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8649664

Citation

Whittington, B R., and C S. Durward. "Survey of Anomalies in Primary Teeth and Their Correlation With the Permanent Dentition." The New Zealand Dental Journal, vol. 92, no. 407, 1996, pp. 4-8.
Whittington BR, Durward CS. Survey of anomalies in primary teeth and their correlation with the permanent dentition. N Z Dent J. 1996;92(407):4-8.
Whittington, B. R., & Durward, C. S. (1996). Survey of anomalies in primary teeth and their correlation with the permanent dentition. The New Zealand Dental Journal, 92(407), 4-8.
Whittington BR, Durward CS. Survey of Anomalies in Primary Teeth and Their Correlation With the Permanent Dentition. N Z Dent J. 1996;92(407):4-8. PubMed PMID: 8649664.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Survey of anomalies in primary teeth and their correlation with the permanent dentition. AU - Whittington,B R, AU - Durward,C S, PY - 1996/3/1/pubmed PY - 1996/3/1/medline PY - 1996/3/1/entrez SP - 4 EP - 8 JF - The New Zealand dental journal JO - N Z Dent J VL - 92 IS - 407 N2 - The purpose of the study was to investigate primary and permanent tooth anomalies of 5-year-old children in Taranaki; 1,680 children were examined by school dental therapists, and the presence of hypodontia, hyperdontia, and double teeth recorded. Panoramic radiographs were taken of those children with anomalies of the primary teeth. Anomalies of the primary teeth were detected in 23 children (1.4 percent). Six children (3 boys and 3 girls) had hypodontia, 3 children (2 boys and 1 girl) had a supernumerary tooth, and 14 children (9 boys and 5 girls) had double teeth. Six of the affected teeth (in 4 boys and 2 girls) were diagnosed as fusion, and 8 (5 boys and 3 girls) as gemination. The panoramic radiographs of the 23 children with anomalies of the primary teeth revealed that 14 (60.9 percent) also had anomalies of the succedaneous permanent teeth. Children with hypodontia in the primary dentition all had corresponding permanent teeth missing. In all but three children, only one tooth was involved. Nineteen of the 30 primary teeth (63 percent) and 12 of the 15 permanent teeth (80 percent) affected by hypodontia, gemination, or fusion were lateral incisors. For each type of anomaly, boys were affected more often than girls. The results of the study confirm that, when there is hypodontia, hyperdontia, gemination, or fusion of teeth in the primary dentition, there is an increased likelihood of anomalies of the succedaneous permanent teeth. Because of this close relationship between the dentitions, early identification of anomalies of the primary teeth can allow the dentist to investigate further and plan for treatment at the appropriate time. SN - 0028-8047 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8649664/Survey_of_anomalies_in_primary_teeth_and_their_correlation_with_the_permanent_dentition_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -