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Monitoring dietary change in a low-fat diet intervention study: advantages of using 24-hour dietary recalls vs food records.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the study was to evaluate two methods of dietary assessment for monitoring change in fat intake in a low-fat diet intervention study.

DESIGN

The two dietary assessment methods were a 4-day food record (4DFR) and an unannounced 24-hour dietary recall conducted by telephone interview (referred to as a telephone recall [TR]). Subjects were assigned randomly to either a low-fat diet intervention group or a control group that received no counseling about fat intake. Dietary data were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months.

SUBJECTS

Two hundred ninety postmenopausal women with localized breast cancer were recruited at seven clinical centers in the United States.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Analysis of variance was used to test for significant differences in mean fat and energy intakes.

RESULTS

Three sources of error were identified: (a) an instrument effect, suggesting underreporting at baseline of approximately 8% in mean energy intake and 11% in mean fat intake in the TR group compared with the 4DFR group (P = .0001); (b) a repeated measures effect observed for the 4DFR, suggesting underreporting of approximately 7% for energy intake and 14% for fat intake in the control group at 6 and 12 months compared with baseline values (P < .001); and (c) an adherence effect (or compliance bias), suggesting greater compliance to the low-fat intervention diet when subjects were keeping food records than when estimates were based on the unannounced TR. Compared with the TR, the 4DFR overestimated the extent of fat reduction in the low-fat diet intervention group by 41% (P = .08) and 25% (P = .62) at 6 and 12 months, respectively.

APPLICATION

Multiple days of unannounced 24-hour recalls may be preferable to multiple-day food records for monitoring dietary change in diet intervention studies.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23298, USA.

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Analysis of Variance
    Diet Records
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Female
    Humans
    Mental Recall
    Middle Aged
    Monitoring, Ambulatory
    Nutrition Assessment
    Patient Compliance
    Telephone
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    8655904

    Citation

    Buzzard, I M., et al. "Monitoring Dietary Change in a Low-fat Diet Intervention Study: Advantages of Using 24-hour Dietary Recalls Vs Food Records." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 96, no. 6, 1996, pp. 574-9.
    Buzzard IM, Faucett CL, Jeffery RW, et al. Monitoring dietary change in a low-fat diet intervention study: advantages of using 24-hour dietary recalls vs food records. J Am Diet Assoc. 1996;96(6):574-9.
    Buzzard, I. M., Faucett, C. L., Jeffery, R. W., McBane, L., McGovern, P., Baxter, J. S., ... Wynder, E. L. (1996). Monitoring dietary change in a low-fat diet intervention study: advantages of using 24-hour dietary recalls vs food records. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 96(6), pp. 574-9.
    Buzzard IM, et al. Monitoring Dietary Change in a Low-fat Diet Intervention Study: Advantages of Using 24-hour Dietary Recalls Vs Food Records. J Am Diet Assoc. 1996;96(6):574-9. PubMed PMID: 8655904.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Monitoring dietary change in a low-fat diet intervention study: advantages of using 24-hour dietary recalls vs food records. AU - Buzzard,I M, AU - Faucett,C L, AU - Jeffery,R W, AU - McBane,L, AU - McGovern,P, AU - Baxter,J S, AU - Shapiro,A C, AU - Blackburn,G L, AU - Chlebowski,R T, AU - Elashoff,R M, AU - Wynder,E L, PY - 1996/6/1/pubmed PY - 1996/6/1/medline PY - 1996/6/1/entrez SP - 574 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 96 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate two methods of dietary assessment for monitoring change in fat intake in a low-fat diet intervention study. DESIGN: The two dietary assessment methods were a 4-day food record (4DFR) and an unannounced 24-hour dietary recall conducted by telephone interview (referred to as a telephone recall [TR]). Subjects were assigned randomly to either a low-fat diet intervention group or a control group that received no counseling about fat intake. Dietary data were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. SUBJECTS: Two hundred ninety postmenopausal women with localized breast cancer were recruited at seven clinical centers in the United States. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis of variance was used to test for significant differences in mean fat and energy intakes. RESULTS: Three sources of error were identified: (a) an instrument effect, suggesting underreporting at baseline of approximately 8% in mean energy intake and 11% in mean fat intake in the TR group compared with the 4DFR group (P = .0001); (b) a repeated measures effect observed for the 4DFR, suggesting underreporting of approximately 7% for energy intake and 14% for fat intake in the control group at 6 and 12 months compared with baseline values (P < .001); and (c) an adherence effect (or compliance bias), suggesting greater compliance to the low-fat intervention diet when subjects were keeping food records than when estimates were based on the unannounced TR. Compared with the TR, the 4DFR overestimated the extent of fat reduction in the low-fat diet intervention group by 41% (P = .08) and 25% (P = .62) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. APPLICATION: Multiple days of unannounced 24-hour recalls may be preferable to multiple-day food records for monitoring dietary change in diet intervention studies. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8655904/Monitoring_dietary_change_in_a_low_fat_diet_intervention_study:_advantages_of_using_24_hour_dietary_recalls_vs_food_records_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(96)00158-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -