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Do dietary and supplementary intakes of antioxidants differ with smoking status?
Int J Epidemiol 1996; 25(1):70-9IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Differences in dietary and supplementary intake of antioxidants were determine between different categories of smokers and never-smokers.

METHODS

Data from a large, cross-sectional, population-based study were used. Subjects (n = 4244) were divided into five smoking categories according to the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Differences in intake of antioxidants or frequency of supplement use were assessed using multiple linear regression analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for potential confounders such as age, body mass index, education level, alcohol intake, and total energy intake.

RESULTS

Men who smoked > 20 cigarettes/day had significantly lower intakes of beta-carotene and especially ascorbic acid compared to those who never smoked, resulting from an almost 60% lower fruit intake. Moderate and heavy smoking women also had lower ascorbic acid and fruit intake but differences were not as large as in men. A higher percentage of female heavy smokers compared with never-smokers consumed vitamin C (21.1% versus 14.1%), vitamin E (5.6% versus 1.8%), and multivitamin supplements (18.5% versus 12.2%). Among men only the moderate smokers differed significantly from never-smokers in supplement intake, in the sense that male moderate smokers had a higher percentage of multivitamin use (15.3% versus 12.2%) compared to never-smokers.

CONCLUSIONS

Male heavy smokers not only have a lower dietary antioxidant intake than never-smokers, but additionally seem to use supplementation relatively infrequently.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chronic Diseases and Environmental Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8666507

Citation

Zondervan, K T., et al. "Do Dietary and Supplementary Intakes of Antioxidants Differ With Smoking Status?" International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 1, 1996, pp. 70-9.
Zondervan KT, Ocké MC, Smit HA, et al. Do dietary and supplementary intakes of antioxidants differ with smoking status? Int J Epidemiol. 1996;25(1):70-9.
Zondervan, K. T., Ocké, M. C., Smit, H. A., & Seidell, J. C. (1996). Do dietary and supplementary intakes of antioxidants differ with smoking status? International Journal of Epidemiology, 25(1), pp. 70-9.
Zondervan KT, et al. Do Dietary and Supplementary Intakes of Antioxidants Differ With Smoking Status. Int J Epidemiol. 1996;25(1):70-9. PubMed PMID: 8666507.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do dietary and supplementary intakes of antioxidants differ with smoking status? AU - Zondervan,K T, AU - Ocké,M C, AU - Smit,H A, AU - Seidell,J C, PY - 1996/2/1/pubmed PY - 1996/2/1/medline PY - 1996/2/1/entrez SP - 70 EP - 9 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Differences in dietary and supplementary intake of antioxidants were determine between different categories of smokers and never-smokers. METHODS: Data from a large, cross-sectional, population-based study were used. Subjects (n = 4244) were divided into five smoking categories according to the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Differences in intake of antioxidants or frequency of supplement use were assessed using multiple linear regression analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for potential confounders such as age, body mass index, education level, alcohol intake, and total energy intake. RESULTS: Men who smoked > 20 cigarettes/day had significantly lower intakes of beta-carotene and especially ascorbic acid compared to those who never smoked, resulting from an almost 60% lower fruit intake. Moderate and heavy smoking women also had lower ascorbic acid and fruit intake but differences were not as large as in men. A higher percentage of female heavy smokers compared with never-smokers consumed vitamin C (21.1% versus 14.1%), vitamin E (5.6% versus 1.8%), and multivitamin supplements (18.5% versus 12.2%). Among men only the moderate smokers differed significantly from never-smokers in supplement intake, in the sense that male moderate smokers had a higher percentage of multivitamin use (15.3% versus 12.2%) compared to never-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Male heavy smokers not only have a lower dietary antioxidant intake than never-smokers, but additionally seem to use supplementation relatively infrequently. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8666507/Do_dietary_and_supplementary_intakes_of_antioxidants_differ_with_smoking_status L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/25.1.70 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -