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Amygdala beta-noradrenergic influences on memory storage involve cholinergic activation.
Neurobiol Learn Mem. 1996 Jan; 65(1):57-64.NL

Abstract

These experiments examined the involvement of the amygdaloid complex as a site of interaction of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic influences on memory storage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (60 days old; 250-300 g) were given a single training trial in an inhibitory avoidance task and a retention test trial 48 h later. Immediately after training buffer control or drug solutions (0.5 microliter) were infused into the amygdala and, in the first experiment only, other drugs were administered intraperitoneally (ip). The first experiment examined the effects of post-training systemic injections of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (100.0 micrograms/kg) administered alone or together with intraamygdala injections of either the muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.0 microgram) or the beta-noradrenergic antagonist propranolol (0.3 microgram). Oxotremorine enhanced retention and atropine, but not propranolol, attenuated the effects of oxotremorine. In the second experiment intraamygdala infusions of the beta-noradrenergic agonist clenbuterol (10.0 ng) were administered either alone or together with atropine (1.0 microgram). Clenbuterol enhanced retention and atropine blocked the effects of clenbuterol. In the third experiment intraamygdala infusions of oxotremorine (3, 10, 30, or 100 ng) were administered either alone or together with propranolol (0.3 microgram). Oxotremorine (3.0 and 10.0 ng) enhanced retention and propranolol did not block the effects of oxotremorine. These findings are consistent with the view that memory storage is regulated by an interaction of beta-noradrenergic and cholinergic influences and suggest that the noradrenergic influences are mediated by the release of acetylcholine and activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors within the amygdala.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of California, Irvine 92717-3800, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8673407

Citation

Introini-Collison, I B., et al. "Amygdala Beta-noradrenergic Influences On Memory Storage Involve Cholinergic Activation." Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, vol. 65, no. 1, 1996, pp. 57-64.
Introini-Collison IB, Dalmaz C, McGaugh JL. Amygdala beta-noradrenergic influences on memory storage involve cholinergic activation. Neurobiol Learn Mem. 1996;65(1):57-64.
Introini-Collison, I. B., Dalmaz, C., & McGaugh, J. L. (1996). Amygdala beta-noradrenergic influences on memory storage involve cholinergic activation. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 65(1), 57-64.
Introini-Collison IB, Dalmaz C, McGaugh JL. Amygdala Beta-noradrenergic Influences On Memory Storage Involve Cholinergic Activation. Neurobiol Learn Mem. 1996;65(1):57-64. PubMed PMID: 8673407.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Amygdala beta-noradrenergic influences on memory storage involve cholinergic activation. AU - Introini-Collison,I B, AU - Dalmaz,C, AU - McGaugh,J L, PY - 1996/1/1/pubmed PY - 1996/1/1/medline PY - 1996/1/1/entrez SP - 57 EP - 64 JF - Neurobiology of learning and memory JO - Neurobiol Learn Mem VL - 65 IS - 1 N2 - These experiments examined the involvement of the amygdaloid complex as a site of interaction of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic influences on memory storage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (60 days old; 250-300 g) were given a single training trial in an inhibitory avoidance task and a retention test trial 48 h later. Immediately after training buffer control or drug solutions (0.5 microliter) were infused into the amygdala and, in the first experiment only, other drugs were administered intraperitoneally (ip). The first experiment examined the effects of post-training systemic injections of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (100.0 micrograms/kg) administered alone or together with intraamygdala injections of either the muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.0 microgram) or the beta-noradrenergic antagonist propranolol (0.3 microgram). Oxotremorine enhanced retention and atropine, but not propranolol, attenuated the effects of oxotremorine. In the second experiment intraamygdala infusions of the beta-noradrenergic agonist clenbuterol (10.0 ng) were administered either alone or together with atropine (1.0 microgram). Clenbuterol enhanced retention and atropine blocked the effects of clenbuterol. In the third experiment intraamygdala infusions of oxotremorine (3, 10, 30, or 100 ng) were administered either alone or together with propranolol (0.3 microgram). Oxotremorine (3.0 and 10.0 ng) enhanced retention and propranolol did not block the effects of oxotremorine. These findings are consistent with the view that memory storage is regulated by an interaction of beta-noradrenergic and cholinergic influences and suggest that the noradrenergic influences are mediated by the release of acetylcholine and activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors within the amygdala. SN - 1074-7427 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8673407/Amygdala_beta_noradrenergic_influences_on_memory_storage_involve_cholinergic_activation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1074-7427(96)90006-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -