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Occult filum terminale syndrome.
Pediatr Neurosurg. 1995; 23(5):228-35.PN

Abstract

Thirty-two pediatric patients presenting with symptoms of urinary dysfunction, stool incontinence and/or severe back and/or leg pain are described. In patients with urological dysfunction, urodynamic testing was consistent with a neurogenic etiology. Imaging studies demonstrated the tip of the conus medullaris to lie above the L2 vertebral body, and the filum terminale to be of normal diameter (< 2 mm) in all patients. A diagnosis of an occult filum terminale syndrome was made based on clinical presentation in the absence of associated imaging abnormalities and section of the filum terminale was performed. Postoperatively, the majority of patients (97%) experienced significant (> 50%) relief of their symptoms. The management of these patients is discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Ky., USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8688347

Citation

Nazar, G B., et al. "Occult Filum Terminale Syndrome." Pediatric Neurosurgery, vol. 23, no. 5, 1995, pp. 228-35.
Nazar GB, Casale AJ, Roberts JG, et al. Occult filum terminale syndrome. Pediatr Neurosurg. 1995;23(5):228-35.
Nazar, G. B., Casale, A. J., Roberts, J. G., & Linden, R. D. (1995). Occult filum terminale syndrome. Pediatric Neurosurgery, 23(5), 228-35.
Nazar GB, et al. Occult Filum Terminale Syndrome. Pediatr Neurosurg. 1995;23(5):228-35. PubMed PMID: 8688347.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Occult filum terminale syndrome. AU - Nazar,G B, AU - Casale,A J, AU - Roberts,J G, AU - Linden,R D, PY - 1995/1/1/pubmed PY - 1995/1/1/medline PY - 1995/1/1/entrez SP - 228 EP - 35 JF - Pediatric neurosurgery JO - Pediatr Neurosurg VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - Thirty-two pediatric patients presenting with symptoms of urinary dysfunction, stool incontinence and/or severe back and/or leg pain are described. In patients with urological dysfunction, urodynamic testing was consistent with a neurogenic etiology. Imaging studies demonstrated the tip of the conus medullaris to lie above the L2 vertebral body, and the filum terminale to be of normal diameter (< 2 mm) in all patients. A diagnosis of an occult filum terminale syndrome was made based on clinical presentation in the absence of associated imaging abnormalities and section of the filum terminale was performed. Postoperatively, the majority of patients (97%) experienced significant (> 50%) relief of their symptoms. The management of these patients is discussed. SN - 1016-2291 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8688347/Occult_filum_terminale_syndrome_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000120965 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -