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Elevated von Willebrand factor antigen predicts deterioration in diabetic peripheral nerve function.
Diabetologia. 1996 Mar; 39(3):336-43.D

Abstract

We have studied the temporal relationship of plasma von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a marker of endothelial damage, with the development of complications in 63 young diabetic patients (56 of whom were insulin-dependent) who took part in a prospective study. Results are presented from baseline to follow-up. In the group as a whole, no significant changes were found in any autonomic function tests, temperature discrimination threshold or nerve conduction velocities. Median motor and peroneal latency were significantly increased, while median motor, peroneal motor and sural sensory potentials were significantly decreased at follow-up compared with baseline (p < 0.001). There was a significant fall in mean plasma vWF antigen and ristocetin co-factor activity in the entire group. Within the group, we identified eight patients whose peroneal motor and sural sensory conduction velocities had decreased by over 2 ms-1. In these patients (Group A), baseline vWF antigen and activity were significantly higher than in the rest of the patients (Group B), (p = 0.04) and vWF antigen was still significantly higher after 3 years (p = 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in incidence of retinopathy, urinary albumin excretion rate or macrovascular disease. To assess the influence of glycaemic control on vWF, we first compared a matched group (C) of diabetic patients with similar HbA1 to that of group A, but with normal nerve conduction velocities: vWF was still significantly higher in group A compared with group C (p = 0.02). Furthermore, hierarchical regression showed that vWF predicted deteriorating nerve function independently of glycaemic control or the type of diabetes. Endothelial dysfunction may be associated with development of peripheral neuropathy in young diabetic patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hematology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8721780

Citation

Plater, M E., et al. "Elevated Von Willebrand Factor Antigen Predicts Deterioration in Diabetic Peripheral Nerve Function." Diabetologia, vol. 39, no. 3, 1996, pp. 336-43.
Plater ME, Ford I, Dent MT, et al. Elevated von Willebrand factor antigen predicts deterioration in diabetic peripheral nerve function. Diabetologia. 1996;39(3):336-43.
Plater, M. E., Ford, I., Dent, M. T., Preston, F. E., & Ward, J. D. (1996). Elevated von Willebrand factor antigen predicts deterioration in diabetic peripheral nerve function. Diabetologia, 39(3), 336-43.
Plater ME, et al. Elevated Von Willebrand Factor Antigen Predicts Deterioration in Diabetic Peripheral Nerve Function. Diabetologia. 1996;39(3):336-43. PubMed PMID: 8721780.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elevated von Willebrand factor antigen predicts deterioration in diabetic peripheral nerve function. AU - Plater,M E, AU - Ford,I, AU - Dent,M T, AU - Preston,F E, AU - Ward,J D, PY - 1996/3/1/pubmed PY - 1996/3/1/medline PY - 1996/3/1/entrez SP - 336 EP - 43 JF - Diabetologia JO - Diabetologia VL - 39 IS - 3 N2 - We have studied the temporal relationship of plasma von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a marker of endothelial damage, with the development of complications in 63 young diabetic patients (56 of whom were insulin-dependent) who took part in a prospective study. Results are presented from baseline to follow-up. In the group as a whole, no significant changes were found in any autonomic function tests, temperature discrimination threshold or nerve conduction velocities. Median motor and peroneal latency were significantly increased, while median motor, peroneal motor and sural sensory potentials were significantly decreased at follow-up compared with baseline (p < 0.001). There was a significant fall in mean plasma vWF antigen and ristocetin co-factor activity in the entire group. Within the group, we identified eight patients whose peroneal motor and sural sensory conduction velocities had decreased by over 2 ms-1. In these patients (Group A), baseline vWF antigen and activity were significantly higher than in the rest of the patients (Group B), (p = 0.04) and vWF antigen was still significantly higher after 3 years (p = 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in incidence of retinopathy, urinary albumin excretion rate or macrovascular disease. To assess the influence of glycaemic control on vWF, we first compared a matched group (C) of diabetic patients with similar HbA1 to that of group A, but with normal nerve conduction velocities: vWF was still significantly higher in group A compared with group C (p = 0.02). Furthermore, hierarchical regression showed that vWF predicted deteriorating nerve function independently of glycaemic control or the type of diabetes. Endothelial dysfunction may be associated with development of peripheral neuropathy in young diabetic patients. SN - 0012-186X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8721780/Elevated_von_Willebrand_factor_antigen_predicts_deterioration_in_diabetic_peripheral_nerve_function_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticnerveproblems.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -