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U.S. Naval helicopter mishaps: cockpit egress problems.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1996 May; 67(5):480-5.AS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

A number of potential problems are associated with egress from the helicopter cockpit in the post-crash phase of a mishap. The purpose of this study was to identify the egress problems experienced by pilots in U.S. Navy/Marine Corp helicopter cockpits, and to propose a priority of preventive interventions.

METHOD

Using Naval Safety Center data, we reviewed 1980-94 Class A helicopter mishap narratives. We identified and categorized cockpit egress problems reported by pilots. The data are described in terms of problem category, helicopter type, crash terrain, and time of day.

RESULTS

Of the 210 survivable mishaps, 289 egress problems were reported in 128 mishaps, 61% involved aircrew factors, 16% environmental factors, 12% were related to helicopter factors, and 11% to cockpit factors. Of the 128 mishaps, 67.5% occurred during daytime, 32.5% at night, 64% in overwater crashes, 26% over land, and 10% over flight decks. The most significant, but uncommon, injuries involved the "stroking seat."

CONCLUSIONS

Egress hazards can be minimized by the implementation of more intensive underwater egress training, crashworthy fuel systems, better design of cockpit exits and hatches, better restraint systems, better crashworthy seats, underwater visual aids, and more streamlined personal equipment. Engineering validation is needed before committing to suggested interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Naval Aerospace and Operational Medical Institute, NAS, Pensacola, FL, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8725478

Citation

Barker, C O., and A H. Bellenkes. "U.S. Naval Helicopter Mishaps: Cockpit Egress Problems." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 67, no. 5, 1996, pp. 480-5.
Barker CO, Bellenkes AH. U.S. Naval helicopter mishaps: cockpit egress problems. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1996;67(5):480-5.
Barker, C. O., & Bellenkes, A. H. (1996). U.S. Naval helicopter mishaps: cockpit egress problems. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 67(5), 480-5.
Barker CO, Bellenkes AH. U.S. Naval Helicopter Mishaps: Cockpit Egress Problems. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1996;67(5):480-5. PubMed PMID: 8725478.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - U.S. Naval helicopter mishaps: cockpit egress problems. AU - Barker,C O, AU - Bellenkes,A H, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 480 EP - 5 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 67 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: A number of potential problems are associated with egress from the helicopter cockpit in the post-crash phase of a mishap. The purpose of this study was to identify the egress problems experienced by pilots in U.S. Navy/Marine Corp helicopter cockpits, and to propose a priority of preventive interventions. METHOD: Using Naval Safety Center data, we reviewed 1980-94 Class A helicopter mishap narratives. We identified and categorized cockpit egress problems reported by pilots. The data are described in terms of problem category, helicopter type, crash terrain, and time of day. RESULTS: Of the 210 survivable mishaps, 289 egress problems were reported in 128 mishaps, 61% involved aircrew factors, 16% environmental factors, 12% were related to helicopter factors, and 11% to cockpit factors. Of the 128 mishaps, 67.5% occurred during daytime, 32.5% at night, 64% in overwater crashes, 26% over land, and 10% over flight decks. The most significant, but uncommon, injuries involved the "stroking seat." CONCLUSIONS: Egress hazards can be minimized by the implementation of more intensive underwater egress training, crashworthy fuel systems, better design of cockpit exits and hatches, better restraint systems, better crashworthy seats, underwater visual aids, and more streamlined personal equipment. Engineering validation is needed before committing to suggested interventions. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8725478/U_S__Naval_helicopter_mishaps:_cockpit_egress_problems_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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