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Plus-maze retest profile in mice: importance of initial stages of trail 1 and response to post-trail cholinergic receptor blockade.
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1996 May; 54(1):41-50.PB

Abstract

Recent research has shown that a single undrugged prior experience of the elevated plus-maze produces significant behavioural changes upon 24-h retest in rats and mice. Typically, when reexposed to the maze, animals display an increased avoidance of the open arms and a corresponding preference for the enclosed sections of the apparatus. Using ethological analyses, the present series of experiments sought to further characterize this phenomenon in mice and to determine whether or not it involves cholinergic receptor mechanisms. Results confirmed that behaviour during Trial 2 is markedly different to that seen on initial exposure, and that such changes are independent of the duration of Trial 1 (2 vs. 5 min). Retest behavioural changes included reduced entry latencies, reduced open arm entries, less time on the open arms and centre platform, lower levels of exploratory head-dipping, and increased entries into and time spent in the closed arms. The importance to the retest phenomenon of the first few minutes of initial exposure was further suggested by min-by-min analyses of the behaviour of animals naive to the maze. Results showed that behaviour during the first min is characterized by high levels of risk assessment from the centre platform and relatively low, but equal, levels of open- and closed-arm exploration. From min 2 onwards, however, behaviour showed a marked change with increasing open arm/centre platform avoidance, increasing closed-arm preference, and decreasing levels of risk assessment and exploratory head-dipping. Thus, it would appear that this within-session aversive learning transfers between sessions to account for behavioural profiles on retest. Irrespective of the duration of Trial 1 (2 or 5 min), posttrial administration of the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg), failed to significantly alter the behavioural changes seen between trials. Data are discussed in relation to the apparent sensitization of fear produced by plus-maze exposure, its possible relation to phobia acquisition, and the need for further research on underlying mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Leeds, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8728537

Citation

Rodgers, R J., et al. "Plus-maze Retest Profile in Mice: Importance of Initial Stages of Trail 1 and Response to Post-trail Cholinergic Receptor Blockade." Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, vol. 54, no. 1, 1996, pp. 41-50.
Rodgers RJ, Johnson NJ, Cole JC, et al. Plus-maze retest profile in mice: importance of initial stages of trail 1 and response to post-trail cholinergic receptor blockade. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1996;54(1):41-50.
Rodgers, R. J., Johnson, N. J., Cole, J. C., Dewar, C. V., Kidd, G. R., & Kimpson, P. H. (1996). Plus-maze retest profile in mice: importance of initial stages of trail 1 and response to post-trail cholinergic receptor blockade. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 54(1), 41-50.
Rodgers RJ, et al. Plus-maze Retest Profile in Mice: Importance of Initial Stages of Trail 1 and Response to Post-trail Cholinergic Receptor Blockade. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1996;54(1):41-50. PubMed PMID: 8728537.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plus-maze retest profile in mice: importance of initial stages of trail 1 and response to post-trail cholinergic receptor blockade. AU - Rodgers,R J, AU - Johnson,N J, AU - Cole,J C, AU - Dewar,C V, AU - Kidd,G R, AU - Kimpson,P H, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 41 EP - 50 JF - Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior JO - Pharmacol Biochem Behav VL - 54 IS - 1 N2 - Recent research has shown that a single undrugged prior experience of the elevated plus-maze produces significant behavioural changes upon 24-h retest in rats and mice. Typically, when reexposed to the maze, animals display an increased avoidance of the open arms and a corresponding preference for the enclosed sections of the apparatus. Using ethological analyses, the present series of experiments sought to further characterize this phenomenon in mice and to determine whether or not it involves cholinergic receptor mechanisms. Results confirmed that behaviour during Trial 2 is markedly different to that seen on initial exposure, and that such changes are independent of the duration of Trial 1 (2 vs. 5 min). Retest behavioural changes included reduced entry latencies, reduced open arm entries, less time on the open arms and centre platform, lower levels of exploratory head-dipping, and increased entries into and time spent in the closed arms. The importance to the retest phenomenon of the first few minutes of initial exposure was further suggested by min-by-min analyses of the behaviour of animals naive to the maze. Results showed that behaviour during the first min is characterized by high levels of risk assessment from the centre platform and relatively low, but equal, levels of open- and closed-arm exploration. From min 2 onwards, however, behaviour showed a marked change with increasing open arm/centre platform avoidance, increasing closed-arm preference, and decreasing levels of risk assessment and exploratory head-dipping. Thus, it would appear that this within-session aversive learning transfers between sessions to account for behavioural profiles on retest. Irrespective of the duration of Trial 1 (2 or 5 min), posttrial administration of the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg), failed to significantly alter the behavioural changes seen between trials. Data are discussed in relation to the apparent sensitization of fear produced by plus-maze exposure, its possible relation to phobia acquisition, and the need for further research on underlying mechanisms. SN - 0091-3057 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8728537/Plus_maze_retest_profile_in_mice:_importance_of_initial_stages_of_trail_1_and_response_to_post_trail_cholinergic_receptor_blockade_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0091305795021566 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -