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Allergen avoidance in infancy and allergy at 4 years of age.
Allergy. 1996 Feb; 51(2):89-93.A

Abstract

In an attempt to prevent or reduce the manifestations of atopic disease, a group of infants considered to be genetically at high risk of atopy was entered in a prenatally randomized, controlled study. A prophylactic group (n = 58) was either breast-fed with their mothers excluding foods regarded as highly antigenic from their diets, or given an extensively hydrolysed formula. In addition, strenuous efforts were made to reduce exposure to the house-dust mite by application of acaricide to the bedroom and living room carpets and upholstered furniture. A control group (n = 62) was fed conventionally by breast or on formula, and no specific environmental measures were taken. The results (previously reported) after 1 year showed significantly less total allergy, asthma, and eczema in the prophylactic group. Similar results were obtained at 2 years although the reduction in asthma no longer achieved statistical significance. However, there was significantly less sensitization, as shown by a battery of skin prick tests (SPTs), to both dietary allergens and aeroallergens in the prophylactic group. All the children have now been reviewed at the age of 4 years, and SPTs to a wide range of dietary allergens and aeroallergens have been performed. The control group continues to show more total allergy (odds ratio [OR] 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-6.13, P < 0.02), definite allergy (allergic symptoms plus positive SPT) (OR 5.6, CI 1.8-17.9, P < 0.005), and eczema (OR 3.4, CI 1.2-10.1, P < 0.05). More control children have positive SPTs (OR 3.7, CI 1.3-10.0, P < 0.02). A dual approach to the prevention of allergic disease, avoiding as far as possible sensitization to food and aeroallergens, significantly reduces the risk of atopic disease. This should be reserved for infants considered at very high risk of atopy, and close medical and dietetic supervision must be available.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Allergy Research Unit, St Mary's Hospital NHS Trust, Newport, Isle of Wight, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8738513

Citation

Hide, D W., et al. "Allergen Avoidance in Infancy and Allergy at 4 Years of Age." Allergy, vol. 51, no. 2, 1996, pp. 89-93.
Hide DW, Matthews S, Tariq S, et al. Allergen avoidance in infancy and allergy at 4 years of age. Allergy. 1996;51(2):89-93.
Hide, D. W., Matthews, S., Tariq, S., & Arshad, S. H. (1996). Allergen avoidance in infancy and allergy at 4 years of age. Allergy, 51(2), 89-93.
Hide DW, et al. Allergen Avoidance in Infancy and Allergy at 4 Years of Age. Allergy. 1996;51(2):89-93. PubMed PMID: 8738513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Allergen avoidance in infancy and allergy at 4 years of age. AU - Hide,D W, AU - Matthews,S, AU - Tariq,S, AU - Arshad,S H, PY - 1996/2/1/pubmed PY - 1996/2/1/medline PY - 1996/2/1/entrez SP - 89 EP - 93 JF - Allergy JO - Allergy VL - 51 IS - 2 N2 - In an attempt to prevent or reduce the manifestations of atopic disease, a group of infants considered to be genetically at high risk of atopy was entered in a prenatally randomized, controlled study. A prophylactic group (n = 58) was either breast-fed with their mothers excluding foods regarded as highly antigenic from their diets, or given an extensively hydrolysed formula. In addition, strenuous efforts were made to reduce exposure to the house-dust mite by application of acaricide to the bedroom and living room carpets and upholstered furniture. A control group (n = 62) was fed conventionally by breast or on formula, and no specific environmental measures were taken. The results (previously reported) after 1 year showed significantly less total allergy, asthma, and eczema in the prophylactic group. Similar results were obtained at 2 years although the reduction in asthma no longer achieved statistical significance. However, there was significantly less sensitization, as shown by a battery of skin prick tests (SPTs), to both dietary allergens and aeroallergens in the prophylactic group. All the children have now been reviewed at the age of 4 years, and SPTs to a wide range of dietary allergens and aeroallergens have been performed. The control group continues to show more total allergy (odds ratio [OR] 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-6.13, P < 0.02), definite allergy (allergic symptoms plus positive SPT) (OR 5.6, CI 1.8-17.9, P < 0.005), and eczema (OR 3.4, CI 1.2-10.1, P < 0.05). More control children have positive SPTs (OR 3.7, CI 1.3-10.0, P < 0.02). A dual approach to the prevention of allergic disease, avoiding as far as possible sensitization to food and aeroallergens, significantly reduces the risk of atopic disease. This should be reserved for infants considered at very high risk of atopy, and close medical and dietetic supervision must be available. SN - 0105-4538 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8738513/Allergen_avoidance_in_infancy_and_allergy_at_4_years_of_age_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0105-4538&amp;date=1996&amp;volume=51&amp;issue=2&amp;spage=89 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -