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The role of bisphosphonates in the treatment of bone metastases--the U.S. experience.
Support Care Cancer. 1996 May; 4(3):213-7.SC

Abstract

Frequent complications of bone metastases include pain, pathologic fracture, hypercalcemia and spinal cord compression. Lytic bone metastases result from excessive activation of osteoclasts by tumor-produced cytokines. Aredia (pamidronate) is a potent bisphosphonate that inhibits osteoclast activation. In two dose-seeking phase I trials in patients with breast cancer and prostate cancer, repeated intravenous infusion of Aredia was shown to be safe and effective in reducing bone resorption and pain. In a randomized phase III trial of 377 patients with multiple myeloma, Aredia was administered in a dosage of 90 mg i.v. every 4 weeks. Compared with placebo, treatment with Aredia was associated with a significant decrease in bone pain and in the incidence and time to development of all skeleton-related events. Data from two phase III breast cancer trials each involving 300 patients are now being analyzed. The newer bisphosphonates can safely be used together with standard anticancer therapy to provide effective palliation of symptoms caused by lytic bone metastases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey 17033, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8739655

Citation

Harvey, H A., and A Lipton. "The Role of Bisphosphonates in the Treatment of Bone Metastases--the U.S. Experience." Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 4, no. 3, 1996, pp. 213-7.
Harvey HA, Lipton A. The role of bisphosphonates in the treatment of bone metastases--the U.S. experience. Support Care Cancer. 1996;4(3):213-7.
Harvey, H. A., & Lipton, A. (1996). The role of bisphosphonates in the treatment of bone metastases--the U.S. experience. Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 4(3), 213-7.
Harvey HA, Lipton A. The Role of Bisphosphonates in the Treatment of Bone Metastases--the U.S. Experience. Support Care Cancer. 1996;4(3):213-7. PubMed PMID: 8739655.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of bisphosphonates in the treatment of bone metastases--the U.S. experience. AU - Harvey,H A, AU - Lipton,A, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 213 EP - 7 JF - Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer JO - Support Care Cancer VL - 4 IS - 3 N2 - Frequent complications of bone metastases include pain, pathologic fracture, hypercalcemia and spinal cord compression. Lytic bone metastases result from excessive activation of osteoclasts by tumor-produced cytokines. Aredia (pamidronate) is a potent bisphosphonate that inhibits osteoclast activation. In two dose-seeking phase I trials in patients with breast cancer and prostate cancer, repeated intravenous infusion of Aredia was shown to be safe and effective in reducing bone resorption and pain. In a randomized phase III trial of 377 patients with multiple myeloma, Aredia was administered in a dosage of 90 mg i.v. every 4 weeks. Compared with placebo, treatment with Aredia was associated with a significant decrease in bone pain and in the incidence and time to development of all skeleton-related events. Data from two phase III breast cancer trials each involving 300 patients are now being analyzed. The newer bisphosphonates can safely be used together with standard anticancer therapy to provide effective palliation of symptoms caused by lytic bone metastases. SN - 0941-4355 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8739655/The_role_of_bisphosphonates_in_the_treatment_of_bone_metastases__the_U_S__experience_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bonecancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -