Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Clustering of pathological features in Alzheimer's disease: clinical and neuroanatomical aspects.
Dementia 1996 May-Jun; 7(3):121-7D

Abstract

We have analyzed the tendency of amyloid load, neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in the hippocampus and neocortex to occur in clusters in 49 consecutive cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This clustering tendency of the pathology was analysed in relation to severity of clinical disease assessed within 6 months before death, duration and age at onset of disease and at death. Amyloid plaques showed only a slight tendency to cluster together while neuritic plaques and, even more, NFT were clearly clustered. A greater clustering tendency was associated with more severe clinical impairment with particularly strong correlations being found between the clustering tendency of NFT in the hippocampus and clinical memory deficit, and between the clustering tendency of NFT in the parietal neocortex and overall cognitive deficit. Neuritic plaques showed similar but less pronounced and robust correlations between clustering and cognitive status. In the hippocampus NFT clustering was also negatively correlated with age at death, but not duration of disease nor age of disease onset. We conclude that clustering characterises neuritic pathology but not diffuse amyloid deposits and significantly affects cognition. The discrepancies between the group diagnosed as AD-only and the patient group that contained all patients, including the ones with mixed pathology, lead us to believe that any additional pathology might have a significant effect on the cognitive status of AD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuropathology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary NHS Trust, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8740625

Citation

Nagy, Z, et al. "Clustering of Pathological Features in Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical and Neuroanatomical Aspects." Dementia (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 7, no. 3, 1996, pp. 121-7.
Nagy Z, Esiri MM, Jobst KA, et al. Clustering of pathological features in Alzheimer's disease: clinical and neuroanatomical aspects. Dementia. 1996;7(3):121-7.
Nagy, Z., Esiri, M. M., Jobst, K. A., Morris, J. H., King, E. M., McDonald, B., ... Barnetson, L. (1996). Clustering of pathological features in Alzheimer's disease: clinical and neuroanatomical aspects. Dementia (Basel, Switzerland), 7(3), pp. 121-7.
Nagy Z, et al. Clustering of Pathological Features in Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical and Neuroanatomical Aspects. Dementia. 1996;7(3):121-7. PubMed PMID: 8740625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clustering of pathological features in Alzheimer's disease: clinical and neuroanatomical aspects. AU - Nagy,Z, AU - Esiri,M M, AU - Jobst,K A, AU - Morris,J H, AU - King,E M, AU - McDonald,B, AU - Litchfield,S, AU - Barnetson,L, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 121 EP - 7 JF - Dementia (Basel, Switzerland) JO - Dementia VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - We have analyzed the tendency of amyloid load, neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in the hippocampus and neocortex to occur in clusters in 49 consecutive cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This clustering tendency of the pathology was analysed in relation to severity of clinical disease assessed within 6 months before death, duration and age at onset of disease and at death. Amyloid plaques showed only a slight tendency to cluster together while neuritic plaques and, even more, NFT were clearly clustered. A greater clustering tendency was associated with more severe clinical impairment with particularly strong correlations being found between the clustering tendency of NFT in the hippocampus and clinical memory deficit, and between the clustering tendency of NFT in the parietal neocortex and overall cognitive deficit. Neuritic plaques showed similar but less pronounced and robust correlations between clustering and cognitive status. In the hippocampus NFT clustering was also negatively correlated with age at death, but not duration of disease nor age of disease onset. We conclude that clustering characterises neuritic pathology but not diffuse amyloid deposits and significantly affects cognition. The discrepancies between the group diagnosed as AD-only and the patient group that contained all patients, including the ones with mixed pathology, lead us to believe that any additional pathology might have a significant effect on the cognitive status of AD patients. SN - 1013-7424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8740625/Clustering_of_pathological_features_in_Alzheimer's_disease:_clinical_and_neuroanatomical_aspects_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alzheimersdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -