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Infant feeding practices, socio-economic conditions and diarrhoeal disease in a traditional area of urban Ilorin, Nigeria.
East Afr Med J 1996; 73(5):283-8EA

Abstract

A cross-sectional study involving 771 children under the age of one year, was carried out in a traditional area of urban Ilorin, Nigeria, to determine how socio-economic conditions and feeding practices relate to diarrhoeal disease among infants. After adjustment has been made (through logistic regression) for covariates, five factors had significant association with diarrhoeal disease. These are the age of the child, parity, mother's education, availability of household kitchen and the feeding of semi-solid food to the infants. The lowest diarrhoeal rate occurred in infants aged 0-3 months while the highest rate occurred among infants seven to nine months old (Odds Ratio = 4.2). Children who were of the fifth or higher birth order had significantly higher risk of diarrhoea when compared with those who were of the first or second birth order (OR = 1.62; P < 0.05). Children of mothers with secondary education had significantly higher risk of diarrhoea compared with children of illiterates (OR = 1.9; P < 0.05). Households that had no kitchen had significantly higher risk of infantile diarrhoea than households with kitchen facilities (P < 0.01). Finally, infants receiving semi-solid food had higher risk of diarrhoea compared to those children not receiving semi-solid food (P < 0.05). Diarrhoeal disease awareness campaign to educate mothers on the dangers of childhood diarrhoea and how to prevent it, through proper hygiene, especially, food hygiene, is advocated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8756027

Citation

Oni, G A.. "Infant Feeding Practices, Socio-economic Conditions and Diarrhoeal Disease in a Traditional Area of Urban Ilorin, Nigeria." East African Medical Journal, vol. 73, no. 5, 1996, pp. 283-8.
Oni GA. Infant feeding practices, socio-economic conditions and diarrhoeal disease in a traditional area of urban Ilorin, Nigeria. East Afr Med J. 1996;73(5):283-8.
Oni, G. A. (1996). Infant feeding practices, socio-economic conditions and diarrhoeal disease in a traditional area of urban Ilorin, Nigeria. East African Medical Journal, 73(5), pp. 283-8.
Oni GA. Infant Feeding Practices, Socio-economic Conditions and Diarrhoeal Disease in a Traditional Area of Urban Ilorin, Nigeria. East Afr Med J. 1996;73(5):283-8. PubMed PMID: 8756027.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant feeding practices, socio-economic conditions and diarrhoeal disease in a traditional area of urban Ilorin, Nigeria. A1 - Oni,G A, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Age Factors KW - Birth Order KW - Child Nutrition KW - Correlation Studies KW - Cross Sectional Analysis KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diarrhea KW - Diarrhea, Infantile--determinants KW - Diet KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Family And Household KW - Family Characteristics KW - Family Relationships KW - Health KW - Hygiene KW - Infant KW - Low Income Population KW - Nigeria KW - Nutrition KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Public Health KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Social Class KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Socioeconomic Status KW - Statistical Studies KW - Studies KW - Western Africa KW - Youth SP - 283 EP - 8 JF - East African medical journal JO - East Afr Med J VL - 73 IS - 5 N2 - A cross-sectional study involving 771 children under the age of one year, was carried out in a traditional area of urban Ilorin, Nigeria, to determine how socio-economic conditions and feeding practices relate to diarrhoeal disease among infants. After adjustment has been made (through logistic regression) for covariates, five factors had significant association with diarrhoeal disease. These are the age of the child, parity, mother's education, availability of household kitchen and the feeding of semi-solid food to the infants. The lowest diarrhoeal rate occurred in infants aged 0-3 months while the highest rate occurred among infants seven to nine months old (Odds Ratio = 4.2). Children who were of the fifth or higher birth order had significantly higher risk of diarrhoea when compared with those who were of the first or second birth order (OR = 1.62; P < 0.05). Children of mothers with secondary education had significantly higher risk of diarrhoea compared with children of illiterates (OR = 1.9; P < 0.05). Households that had no kitchen had significantly higher risk of infantile diarrhoea than households with kitchen facilities (P < 0.01). Finally, infants receiving semi-solid food had higher risk of diarrhoea compared to those children not receiving semi-solid food (P < 0.05). Diarrhoeal disease awareness campaign to educate mothers on the dangers of childhood diarrhoea and how to prevent it, through proper hygiene, especially, food hygiene, is advocated. SN - 0012-835X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8756027/Infant_feeding_practices_socio_economic_conditions_and_diarrhoeal_disease_in_a_traditional_area_of_urban_Ilorin_Nigeria_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/infantandnewbornnutrition.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -