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[Food hypersensitivities].

Abstract

Food hypersensitivity includes adverse reactions to food which are most often mediated by IgE. Food allergy is the first atopic disease. Food-sensitized individuals can develop allergic reactions such as atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, rhinitis, asthma or digestive symptoms. Anaphylactic shock is the most severe reaction of immediate hypersensitivity. The prevalence of food allergy has drastically increased during the last years. Numerous food products can be involved, with special emphasis on masked allergens in processed foods. The diagnosis of food hypersensitivity is based on clinical history, analysis of patient's food intake, skin tests and placebo-controlled food challenge tests. Oral food-challenge tests allow a distinction between food sensitization and true food hypersensitivity. Treatment consists in avoidance of the offending food allergen associated with adjunctive therapy by antihistamines and disodium cromoglycate. The prescription of a first-aid kit is required in case of anaphylaxis. Specific immunotherapy seems to be an interesting therapeutic prospect. Prevention remains essential.

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Service de médecine D, CHU de Nancy.

Source

La Revue du praticien 46:8 1996 Apr 15 pg 961-7

MeSH

Adult
Allergens
Child
Food Hypersensitivity
Humans
Infant

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

8762232

Citation

Moneret-Vautrin, D A., and G Kanny. "[Food Hypersensitivities]." La Revue Du Praticien, vol. 46, no. 8, 1996, pp. 961-7.
Moneret-Vautrin DA, Kanny G. [Food hypersensitivities]. Rev Prat. 1996;46(8):961-7.
Moneret-Vautrin, D. A., & Kanny, G. (1996). [Food hypersensitivities]. La Revue Du Praticien, 46(8), pp. 961-7.
Moneret-Vautrin DA, Kanny G. [Food Hypersensitivities]. Rev Prat. 1996 Apr 15;46(8):961-7. PubMed PMID: 8762232.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Food hypersensitivities]. AU - Moneret-Vautrin,D A, AU - Kanny,G, PY - 1996/4/15/pubmed PY - 1996/4/15/medline PY - 1996/4/15/entrez SP - 961 EP - 7 JF - La Revue du praticien JO - Rev Prat VL - 46 IS - 8 N2 - Food hypersensitivity includes adverse reactions to food which are most often mediated by IgE. Food allergy is the first atopic disease. Food-sensitized individuals can develop allergic reactions such as atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, rhinitis, asthma or digestive symptoms. Anaphylactic shock is the most severe reaction of immediate hypersensitivity. The prevalence of food allergy has drastically increased during the last years. Numerous food products can be involved, with special emphasis on masked allergens in processed foods. The diagnosis of food hypersensitivity is based on clinical history, analysis of patient's food intake, skin tests and placebo-controlled food challenge tests. Oral food-challenge tests allow a distinction between food sensitization and true food hypersensitivity. Treatment consists in avoidance of the offending food allergen associated with adjunctive therapy by antihistamines and disodium cromoglycate. The prescription of a first-aid kit is required in case of anaphylaxis. Specific immunotherapy seems to be an interesting therapeutic prospect. Prevention remains essential. SN - 0035-2640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8762232/[Food_hypersensitivities]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodallergy.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -