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Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke--perceptions of African American children and adolescents.
Prev Med. 1996 May-Jun; 25(3):286-92.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A study was designed to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts with regard to exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) among a sample of urban African American children and adolescents.

METHODS

A sample of 675 students enrolled in grades 5 through 12 in an urban public school district located in the greater metropolitan area of Detroit, Michigan, was surveyed.

RESULTS

Smoking rates among students were higher if someone else in the home was a smoker and lower if there were no other smokers in the home. Forty-eight percent of the students reported that their fathers smoked, while 46% reported mothers who smoked. In each of the areas knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts, elementary students scored highest and middle school students scored lowest. Attitude scores were higher if the mother or father was a nonsmoker, and nonsmokers scored higher than smokers on knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts. Students' preventive efforts were significantly predicted by their knowledge, attitudes, and gender, while their attitudes were in turn predicted by their knowledge, gender, school level, and smoking status and by the proportion of their friends who were smokers. Students' knowledge was significantly predicted by their gender and school level and by the proportion of their siblings who were smokers.

CONCLUSIONS

It is apparent that many of the African American students surveyed in this study experience significant exposure to ETS, particularly in the home. As is evident from the literature, this has implications for the long term health of these youngsters. Health education and promotion efforts should be directed not only toward the students themselves, but should also address the smoking behavior of parents and others in the home environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8781006

Citation

Kurtz, M E., et al. "Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke--perceptions of African American Children and Adolescents." Preventive Medicine, vol. 25, no. 3, 1996, pp. 286-92.
Kurtz ME, Kurtz JC, Johnson SM, et al. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke--perceptions of African American children and adolescents. Prev Med. 1996;25(3):286-92.
Kurtz, M. E., Kurtz, J. C., Johnson, S. M., & Beverly, E. E. (1996). Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke--perceptions of African American children and adolescents. Preventive Medicine, 25(3), 286-92.
Kurtz ME, et al. Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke--perceptions of African American Children and Adolescents. Prev Med. 1996 May-Jun;25(3):286-92. PubMed PMID: 8781006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke--perceptions of African American children and adolescents. AU - Kurtz,M E, AU - Kurtz,J C, AU - Johnson,S M, AU - Beverly,E E, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 286 EP - 92 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: A study was designed to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts with regard to exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) among a sample of urban African American children and adolescents. METHODS: A sample of 675 students enrolled in grades 5 through 12 in an urban public school district located in the greater metropolitan area of Detroit, Michigan, was surveyed. RESULTS: Smoking rates among students were higher if someone else in the home was a smoker and lower if there were no other smokers in the home. Forty-eight percent of the students reported that their fathers smoked, while 46% reported mothers who smoked. In each of the areas knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts, elementary students scored highest and middle school students scored lowest. Attitude scores were higher if the mother or father was a nonsmoker, and nonsmokers scored higher than smokers on knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts. Students' preventive efforts were significantly predicted by their knowledge, attitudes, and gender, while their attitudes were in turn predicted by their knowledge, gender, school level, and smoking status and by the proportion of their friends who were smokers. Students' knowledge was significantly predicted by their gender and school level and by the proportion of their siblings who were smokers. CONCLUSIONS: It is apparent that many of the African American students surveyed in this study experience significant exposure to ETS, particularly in the home. As is evident from the literature, this has implications for the long term health of these youngsters. Health education and promotion efforts should be directed not only toward the students themselves, but should also address the smoking behavior of parents and others in the home environment. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8781006/Exposure_to_environmental_tobacco_smoke__perceptions_of_African_American_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(96)90058-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -