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A comparative study of the risk factors for lung cancer in Guangdong, China.
Lung Cancer 1996; 14 Suppl 1:S99-105LC

Abstract

A case-control study involving 390 lung cancer cases, matched 1:1 with controls, was carried out in Guangdong Province to compare risk factors for different histopathologic types of lung cancer in both sexes. Female and male lung cancers appear to differ in epidemiological characteristics, pathologic types, and risk factors. The 291 lung cancer cases in males were predominantly squamous cell lung carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma/adenocarcinoma = 1:0.5), whereas the 99 female lung cancer cases were predominantly adenocarcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma/adenocarcinoma = 1:2.7). The age at which lung cancer was first diagnosed was lower for females than for males (P < 0.0001). Single-factor conditional logistic regression analysis showed an association of lung cancer with family history of tumors, family history of lung cancer, history of chronic bronchitis/emphysema, history of tuberculosis, history of other lung disease, smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the home and in the workplace, being professional drivers, use of oral contraceptives, and consumption of pickled and salted fish (P < 0.05). Further multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that family history of tuberculosis, history of chronic bronchitis/emphysema, family history of tumors, smoking, exposure to ETS in the home and in the workplace, and consumption of pickled and salted fish were independent risk factors for lung cancer. Using log-linear model analysis, it was confirmed that lung cancer had significant interactions with chronic bronchitis/emphysema, exposure to ETS, history of tuberculosis and smoking. Smoking, however, could only explain 1/5 of the incidence of female lung cancers. Family history of lung cancer and the use of oral contraceptives were related to lung cancer in women. Except for a weak relationship with history of chronic bronchitis/emphysema, adenocarcinoma was found to have no association with the other risk factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8785673

Citation

Wang, S Y., et al. "A Comparative Study of the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Guangdong, China." Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), vol. 14 Suppl 1, 1996, pp. S99-105.
Wang SY, Hu YL, Wu YL, et al. A comparative study of the risk factors for lung cancer in Guangdong, China. Lung Cancer. 1996;14 Suppl 1:S99-105.
Wang, S. Y., Hu, Y. L., Wu, Y. L., Li, X., Chi, G. B., Chen, Y., & Dai, W. S. (1996). A comparative study of the risk factors for lung cancer in Guangdong, China. Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 14 Suppl 1, pp. S99-105.
Wang SY, et al. A Comparative Study of the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Guangdong, China. Lung Cancer. 1996;14 Suppl 1:S99-105. PubMed PMID: 8785673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparative study of the risk factors for lung cancer in Guangdong, China. AU - Wang,S Y, AU - Hu,Y L, AU - Wu,Y L, AU - Li,X, AU - Chi,G B, AU - Chen,Y, AU - Dai,W S, PY - 1996/3/1/pubmed PY - 1996/3/1/medline PY - 1996/3/1/entrez SP - S99 EP - 105 JF - Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) JO - Lung Cancer VL - 14 Suppl 1 N2 - A case-control study involving 390 lung cancer cases, matched 1:1 with controls, was carried out in Guangdong Province to compare risk factors for different histopathologic types of lung cancer in both sexes. Female and male lung cancers appear to differ in epidemiological characteristics, pathologic types, and risk factors. The 291 lung cancer cases in males were predominantly squamous cell lung carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma/adenocarcinoma = 1:0.5), whereas the 99 female lung cancer cases were predominantly adenocarcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma/adenocarcinoma = 1:2.7). The age at which lung cancer was first diagnosed was lower for females than for males (P < 0.0001). Single-factor conditional logistic regression analysis showed an association of lung cancer with family history of tumors, family history of lung cancer, history of chronic bronchitis/emphysema, history of tuberculosis, history of other lung disease, smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the home and in the workplace, being professional drivers, use of oral contraceptives, and consumption of pickled and salted fish (P < 0.05). Further multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that family history of tuberculosis, history of chronic bronchitis/emphysema, family history of tumors, smoking, exposure to ETS in the home and in the workplace, and consumption of pickled and salted fish were independent risk factors for lung cancer. Using log-linear model analysis, it was confirmed that lung cancer had significant interactions with chronic bronchitis/emphysema, exposure to ETS, history of tuberculosis and smoking. Smoking, however, could only explain 1/5 of the incidence of female lung cancers. Family history of lung cancer and the use of oral contraceptives were related to lung cancer in women. Except for a weak relationship with history of chronic bronchitis/emphysema, adenocarcinoma was found to have no association with the other risk factors. SN - 0169-5002 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8785673/A_comparative_study_of_the_risk_factors_for_lung_cancer_in_Guangdong_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0169500296005284 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -