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Pentoxifylline maintains cochlear microcirculation and attenuates temporary threshold shifts following acoustic overstimulation.
Acta Otolaryngol. 1996 May; 116(3):388-94.AO

Abstract

The etiology of noise-induced hearing loss is poorly understood despite years of clinical experience and experimental investigations. One potential mechanism which may contribute to noise-induced temporary threshold shifts (TTS) are vascular pathologies in the microcirculation of the cochlea. Several studies have demonstrated histologic evidence of reduced cochlear blood flow following noise exposure. Recent studies utilizing intravital microscopy (IVM) complement these histologic studies and furthermore demonstrate localized ischemia during noise exposure. The purpose of the current study was to attempt to maintain cochlear blood flow during noise exposure by treating with pentoxifylline, a xanthine derivative which promotes blood flow in capillary beds. The possibility that preserved cochlear microcirculation with pentoxifylline treatment attenuates noise-induced TTS was also examined in this study. The results show treatment with pentoxifylline maintains cochlear microcirculation as assessed by continuous red blood cell movement through capillaries. Pentoxifylline treatment did not prevent vasoconstriction or increased permeability often observed in the cochlear microvasculature during noise. Treatment with this drug reduced noise-induced TTS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8790737

Citation

Latoni, J, et al. "Pentoxifylline Maintains Cochlear Microcirculation and Attenuates Temporary Threshold Shifts Following Acoustic Overstimulation." Acta Oto-laryngologica, vol. 116, no. 3, 1996, pp. 388-94.
Latoni J, Shivapuja B, Seidman MD, et al. Pentoxifylline maintains cochlear microcirculation and attenuates temporary threshold shifts following acoustic overstimulation. Acta Otolaryngol. 1996;116(3):388-94.
Latoni, J., Shivapuja, B., Seidman, M. D., & Quirk, W. S. (1996). Pentoxifylline maintains cochlear microcirculation and attenuates temporary threshold shifts following acoustic overstimulation. Acta Oto-laryngologica, 116(3), 388-94.
Latoni J, et al. Pentoxifylline Maintains Cochlear Microcirculation and Attenuates Temporary Threshold Shifts Following Acoustic Overstimulation. Acta Otolaryngol. 1996;116(3):388-94. PubMed PMID: 8790737.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pentoxifylline maintains cochlear microcirculation and attenuates temporary threshold shifts following acoustic overstimulation. AU - Latoni,J, AU - Shivapuja,B, AU - Seidman,M D, AU - Quirk,W S, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 388 EP - 94 JF - Acta oto-laryngologica JO - Acta Otolaryngol. VL - 116 IS - 3 N2 - The etiology of noise-induced hearing loss is poorly understood despite years of clinical experience and experimental investigations. One potential mechanism which may contribute to noise-induced temporary threshold shifts (TTS) are vascular pathologies in the microcirculation of the cochlea. Several studies have demonstrated histologic evidence of reduced cochlear blood flow following noise exposure. Recent studies utilizing intravital microscopy (IVM) complement these histologic studies and furthermore demonstrate localized ischemia during noise exposure. The purpose of the current study was to attempt to maintain cochlear blood flow during noise exposure by treating with pentoxifylline, a xanthine derivative which promotes blood flow in capillary beds. The possibility that preserved cochlear microcirculation with pentoxifylline treatment attenuates noise-induced TTS was also examined in this study. The results show treatment with pentoxifylline maintains cochlear microcirculation as assessed by continuous red blood cell movement through capillaries. Pentoxifylline treatment did not prevent vasoconstriction or increased permeability often observed in the cochlear microvasculature during noise. Treatment with this drug reduced noise-induced TTS. SN - 0001-6489 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8790737/Pentoxifylline_maintains_cochlear_microcirculation_and_attenuates_temporary_threshold_shifts_following_acoustic_overstimulation_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016489609137862 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -