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Metaproterenol responsiveness after methacholine- and histamine-induced bronchoconstriction.
Chest. 1996 Sep; 110(3):617-23.Chest

Abstract

We investigated whether the bronchodilator response to a beta-adrenergic agonist is influenced by the mechanism of induced bronchoconstriction. Normal subjects and asymptomatic asthmatics inhaled a dry aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter, 1.5 microns) with increasing concentrations of methacholine or histamine to produce a 35% decrease in specific airway conductance (SGaw), followed by a single inhalation of a metaproterenol aerosol. By studying normal subjects and asthmatics, we were able to compare metaproterenol responsiveness after widely divergent doses of the bronchoprovocative agents but the same degree of bronchoconstriction. Airway deposition of methacholine, histamine, and metaproterenol was measured using a quinine fluorescence technique. Mean baseline SGaw, metaproterenol responsiveness, and metaproterenol mass deposited were similar in normal subjects and asthmatics. Likewise, mean SGaw after completion of methacholine and histamine challenge, and the subsequently deposited metaproterenol mass were similar in the two groups. After methacholine challenge (mean +/- SD provocative drug mass causing a 35% decrease in SGaw, PM35: 8.94 +/- 5.96 mumol in normal subject and 0.30 +/- 0.29 mumol in asthmatics), metaproterenol increased mean SGaw by 89 +/- 33% in normal subjects and by 190 +/- 55% in asthmatics (p < 0.05, two-way analysis of variance). After histamine challenge (PM35, 2.92 +/- 2.49 mumol in normal subjects and 0.17 +/- 0.29 mumol in asthmatics), metaproterenol increased mean SGaw by 111 +/- 38% in normal subjects and 113 +/- 69% in asthmatics (p = not significant). Thus, for the same degree of bronchoconstriction, metaproterenol responsiveness was influenced by the dose of methacholine but not the dose of histamine. The differential metaproterenol response could be related to a functional antagonism between muscarinic and beta-adrenergic agonists.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Basel, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8797401

Citation

Elsasser, S, et al. "Metaproterenol Responsiveness After Methacholine- and Histamine-induced Bronchoconstriction." Chest, vol. 110, no. 3, 1996, pp. 617-23.
Elsasser S, Donna E, Demirozu CM, et al. Metaproterenol responsiveness after methacholine- and histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. Chest. 1996;110(3):617-23.
Elsasser, S., Donna, E., Demirozu, C. M., Danta, I., & Wanner, A. (1996). Metaproterenol responsiveness after methacholine- and histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. Chest, 110(3), 617-23.
Elsasser S, et al. Metaproterenol Responsiveness After Methacholine- and Histamine-induced Bronchoconstriction. Chest. 1996;110(3):617-23. PubMed PMID: 8797401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metaproterenol responsiveness after methacholine- and histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. AU - Elsasser,S, AU - Donna,E, AU - Demirozu,C M, AU - Danta,I, AU - Wanner,A, PY - 1996/9/1/pubmed PY - 1996/9/1/medline PY - 1996/9/1/entrez SP - 617 EP - 23 JF - Chest JO - Chest VL - 110 IS - 3 N2 - We investigated whether the bronchodilator response to a beta-adrenergic agonist is influenced by the mechanism of induced bronchoconstriction. Normal subjects and asymptomatic asthmatics inhaled a dry aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter, 1.5 microns) with increasing concentrations of methacholine or histamine to produce a 35% decrease in specific airway conductance (SGaw), followed by a single inhalation of a metaproterenol aerosol. By studying normal subjects and asthmatics, we were able to compare metaproterenol responsiveness after widely divergent doses of the bronchoprovocative agents but the same degree of bronchoconstriction. Airway deposition of methacholine, histamine, and metaproterenol was measured using a quinine fluorescence technique. Mean baseline SGaw, metaproterenol responsiveness, and metaproterenol mass deposited were similar in normal subjects and asthmatics. Likewise, mean SGaw after completion of methacholine and histamine challenge, and the subsequently deposited metaproterenol mass were similar in the two groups. After methacholine challenge (mean +/- SD provocative drug mass causing a 35% decrease in SGaw, PM35: 8.94 +/- 5.96 mumol in normal subject and 0.30 +/- 0.29 mumol in asthmatics), metaproterenol increased mean SGaw by 89 +/- 33% in normal subjects and by 190 +/- 55% in asthmatics (p < 0.05, two-way analysis of variance). After histamine challenge (PM35, 2.92 +/- 2.49 mumol in normal subjects and 0.17 +/- 0.29 mumol in asthmatics), metaproterenol increased mean SGaw by 111 +/- 38% in normal subjects and 113 +/- 69% in asthmatics (p = not significant). Thus, for the same degree of bronchoconstriction, metaproterenol responsiveness was influenced by the dose of methacholine but not the dose of histamine. The differential metaproterenol response could be related to a functional antagonism between muscarinic and beta-adrenergic agonists. SN - 0012-3692 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8797401/Metaproterenol_responsiveness_after_methacholine__and_histamine_induced_bronchoconstriction_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0012-3692(16)41060-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -