Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Secondary cataract formation following pediatric intraocular lens implantation: 6-month results.
Ger J Ophthalmol. 1996 May; 5(3):171-5.GJ

Abstract

Secondary membrane formation is the most common complication of posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) implantation in children. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of various methods of managing the posterior capsule and anterior vitreous on the rate of posterior capsular opacification in children implanted with PC IOLs. We retrospectively studied 16 eyes of 12 children (age 1.5-12 years) implanted with PC IOLs; the follow-up period was at least 6 months. The posterior capsule and anterior vitreous were managed in a variety of ways: in 5 eyes the posterior capsule was left intact, and 11 eyes underwent posterior capsulorehexis (PCCC)-6 cases without and 5 cases with anterior vitrectomy. In two eyes of each of the last two groups, posterior optic capture was performed. Visually significant secondary cataract developed in all five eyes with intact posterior capsules and in the four eyes that had undergone PCCC without vitrectomy and without posterior optic capture. The optical axis remained clear in all eyes that had undergone vitrectomy and in all eyes treated with posterior optic capture. Each procedure, posterior optic capture and anterior vitrectomy appears to be effective in preventing or delaying posterior opacification in lens implantation in infants and children. However, a longterm follow-up is required to determine the efficacy and safety of these two approaches.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cullen Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8803580

Citation

Kohnen, T, et al. "Secondary Cataract Formation Following Pediatric Intraocular Lens Implantation: 6-month Results." German Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 5, no. 3, 1996, pp. 171-5.
Kohnen T, Peña-Cuesta R, Koch DD. Secondary cataract formation following pediatric intraocular lens implantation: 6-month results. Ger J Ophthalmol. 1996;5(3):171-5.
Kohnen, T., Peña-Cuesta, R., & Koch, D. D. (1996). Secondary cataract formation following pediatric intraocular lens implantation: 6-month results. German Journal of Ophthalmology, 5(3), 171-5.
Kohnen T, Peña-Cuesta R, Koch DD. Secondary Cataract Formation Following Pediatric Intraocular Lens Implantation: 6-month Results. Ger J Ophthalmol. 1996;5(3):171-5. PubMed PMID: 8803580.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondary cataract formation following pediatric intraocular lens implantation: 6-month results. AU - Kohnen,T, AU - Peña-Cuesta,R, AU - Koch,D D, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 171 EP - 5 JF - German journal of ophthalmology JO - Ger J Ophthalmol VL - 5 IS - 3 N2 - Secondary membrane formation is the most common complication of posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) implantation in children. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of various methods of managing the posterior capsule and anterior vitreous on the rate of posterior capsular opacification in children implanted with PC IOLs. We retrospectively studied 16 eyes of 12 children (age 1.5-12 years) implanted with PC IOLs; the follow-up period was at least 6 months. The posterior capsule and anterior vitreous were managed in a variety of ways: in 5 eyes the posterior capsule was left intact, and 11 eyes underwent posterior capsulorehexis (PCCC)-6 cases without and 5 cases with anterior vitrectomy. In two eyes of each of the last two groups, posterior optic capture was performed. Visually significant secondary cataract developed in all five eyes with intact posterior capsules and in the four eyes that had undergone PCCC without vitrectomy and without posterior optic capture. The optical axis remained clear in all eyes that had undergone vitrectomy and in all eyes treated with posterior optic capture. Each procedure, posterior optic capture and anterior vitrectomy appears to be effective in preventing or delaying posterior opacification in lens implantation in infants and children. However, a longterm follow-up is required to determine the efficacy and safety of these two approaches. SN - 0941-2921 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8803580/Secondary_cataract_formation_following_pediatric_intraocular_lens_implantation:_6_month_results_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/cataract.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -