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Celiac disease and type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood: follow-up study.
J Diabetes Complications. 1996 May-Jun; 10(3):154-9.JD

Abstract

To ascertain the specificity of IgA and IgG antigliadin (IgA-AGA, IgG-AGA), IgA-antireticulin (R1-ARA), and antiendomysial (AEA) antibodies for the diagnosis of celiac disease, we evaluated 133 type I diabetic children aged 1.4-28.4 years (mean 14.1 +/- 6.6), with diabetes from onset to 20.5 years. Fifty-three patients were considered at onset and 49 of these also during follow-up. IgA-AGA and IgG-AGA were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), R1-ARA and AEA by indirect immunofluorescence. IgA-AGA were positive in 20 of 133 (15%), IgG-AGA were positive in seven of 133 (5.26%), while R1-ARA and AEA were positive in three patients. At the onset of disease we found elevated IgA-AGA in 17 of 53 (32%) patients, IgG-AGA in four (7.55%) patients, three of them with IgA-AGA as well; R1-ARA and AEA were present in three (5.66%) patients, all with high IgA-AGA levels. During 1-10 year follow-up IgA-AGA decreased to within the normal range in 13 patients, with elevated IgA-AGA at onset but without R1-ARA and AEA; in four patients with high IgA-AGA at onset, IgA-AGA remained constantly elevated as did R1-ARA and AEA in three of them; and two patients, without IgA-AGA, R1-ARA, and AEA at onset, became positive for all three antibodies. Intestinal biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of celiac disease in five of these with IgA-AGA, R1-ARA, and AEA, but not in one patient with persistent IgA-AGA but no AEA and R1-ARA, suggesting that R1-ARA and AEA are more reliable markers for the screening of celiac disease in type I diabetic patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, University of Pavia, Policlinico San Matteo I.R.C.C.S., Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8807465

Citation

Lorini, R, et al. "Celiac Disease and Type I (insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus in Childhood: Follow-up Study." Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, vol. 10, no. 3, 1996, pp. 154-9.
Lorini R, Scotta MS, Cortona L, et al. Celiac disease and type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood: follow-up study. J Diabetes Complicat. 1996;10(3):154-9.
Lorini, R., Scotta, M. S., Cortona, L., Avanzini, M. A., Vitali, L., De Giacomo, C., Scaramuzza, A., & Severi, F. (1996). Celiac disease and type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood: follow-up study. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, 10(3), 154-9.
Lorini R, et al. Celiac Disease and Type I (insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus in Childhood: Follow-up Study. J Diabetes Complicat. 1996 May-Jun;10(3):154-9. PubMed PMID: 8807465.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Celiac disease and type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood: follow-up study. AU - Lorini,R, AU - Scotta,M S, AU - Cortona,L, AU - Avanzini,M A, AU - Vitali,L, AU - De Giacomo,C, AU - Scaramuzza,A, AU - Severi,F, PY - 1996/5/1/pubmed PY - 1996/5/1/medline PY - 1996/5/1/entrez SP - 154 EP - 9 JF - Journal of diabetes and its complications JO - J. Diabetes Complicat. VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - To ascertain the specificity of IgA and IgG antigliadin (IgA-AGA, IgG-AGA), IgA-antireticulin (R1-ARA), and antiendomysial (AEA) antibodies for the diagnosis of celiac disease, we evaluated 133 type I diabetic children aged 1.4-28.4 years (mean 14.1 +/- 6.6), with diabetes from onset to 20.5 years. Fifty-three patients were considered at onset and 49 of these also during follow-up. IgA-AGA and IgG-AGA were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), R1-ARA and AEA by indirect immunofluorescence. IgA-AGA were positive in 20 of 133 (15%), IgG-AGA were positive in seven of 133 (5.26%), while R1-ARA and AEA were positive in three patients. At the onset of disease we found elevated IgA-AGA in 17 of 53 (32%) patients, IgG-AGA in four (7.55%) patients, three of them with IgA-AGA as well; R1-ARA and AEA were present in three (5.66%) patients, all with high IgA-AGA levels. During 1-10 year follow-up IgA-AGA decreased to within the normal range in 13 patients, with elevated IgA-AGA at onset but without R1-ARA and AEA; in four patients with high IgA-AGA at onset, IgA-AGA remained constantly elevated as did R1-ARA and AEA in three of them; and two patients, without IgA-AGA, R1-ARA, and AEA at onset, became positive for all three antibodies. Intestinal biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of celiac disease in five of these with IgA-AGA, R1-ARA, and AEA, but not in one patient with persistent IgA-AGA but no AEA and R1-ARA, suggesting that R1-ARA and AEA are more reliable markers for the screening of celiac disease in type I diabetic patients. SN - 1056-8727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8807465/Celiac_disease_and_type_I__insulin_dependent__diabetes_mellitus_in_childhood:_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/1056-8727(96)00056-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -