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Broad cross-neutralizing activity in serum is associated with slow progression and low risk of transmission in primate lentivirus infections.
Immunol Lett. 1996 Jun; 51(1-2):95-9.IL

Abstract

Sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2)-infected humans were tested with autologous (from the same individual) and heterologous (from other individuals) virus isolates in a neutralization assay. Similarly, sera from experimentally simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsm from sooty mangabey) or HIV-2SBL6669-infected cynomolgus macaques were tested for neutralizing activity against autologous and heterologous reisolates. In the neutralization assay, the virus dose ranged between 10-75 50% infectious dose (ID50), sera were used in five 2- or 4-fold dilutions, beginning with 1:20, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) served as target cells. The readout of the 7-day assay was a HIV-1 or HIV-2 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results show that SIVsm-inoculated monkeys who develop early immunodeficiency lack serum neutralizing activity or develop a neutralizing antibody response with narrow specificity. Long survival is associated with the ability to neutralize several autologous and heterologous SIVsm reisolates. Infection of macaques with HIV-2SBL6669 did not cause disease within the 5 years observation time and elicited a broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibody response, including neutralization of other, independently obtained, HIV-2 isolates. In HIV-1-infected humans, neutralizing antibodies can only be detected in up to 50% of cases. Neutralizing activity, whenever present, may show a broad specificity, that is, neutralization may occur across genetic subtypes. Presence of broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies is associated with a lower risk of HIV-1 (subtype B) transmission both from mother to child and sexually from male to female. Unlike HIV-1 infection, serum neutralizing activity is regularly present in HIV-2 infection. In view of the differences between HIV-1 and HIV-2 pathogenesis, we suggest that an effective neutralizing antibody response may contribute to a delay in disease progression and to a decrease in risk of transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Microbiology and Tumorbiology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8811351

Citation

Fenyö, E M., and P Putkonen. "Broad Cross-neutralizing Activity in Serum Is Associated With Slow Progression and Low Risk of Transmission in Primate Lentivirus Infections." Immunology Letters, vol. 51, no. 1-2, 1996, pp. 95-9.
Fenyö EM, Putkonen P. Broad cross-neutralizing activity in serum is associated with slow progression and low risk of transmission in primate lentivirus infections. Immunol Lett. 1996;51(1-2):95-9.
Fenyö, E. M., & Putkonen, P. (1996). Broad cross-neutralizing activity in serum is associated with slow progression and low risk of transmission in primate lentivirus infections. Immunology Letters, 51(1-2), 95-9.
Fenyö EM, Putkonen P. Broad Cross-neutralizing Activity in Serum Is Associated With Slow Progression and Low Risk of Transmission in Primate Lentivirus Infections. Immunol Lett. 1996;51(1-2):95-9. PubMed PMID: 8811351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Broad cross-neutralizing activity in serum is associated with slow progression and low risk of transmission in primate lentivirus infections. AU - Fenyö,E M, AU - Putkonen,P, PY - 1996/6/1/pubmed PY - 1996/6/1/medline PY - 1996/6/1/entrez SP - 95 EP - 9 JF - Immunology letters JO - Immunol Lett VL - 51 IS - 1-2 N2 - Sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2)-infected humans were tested with autologous (from the same individual) and heterologous (from other individuals) virus isolates in a neutralization assay. Similarly, sera from experimentally simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsm from sooty mangabey) or HIV-2SBL6669-infected cynomolgus macaques were tested for neutralizing activity against autologous and heterologous reisolates. In the neutralization assay, the virus dose ranged between 10-75 50% infectious dose (ID50), sera were used in five 2- or 4-fold dilutions, beginning with 1:20, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) served as target cells. The readout of the 7-day assay was a HIV-1 or HIV-2 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results show that SIVsm-inoculated monkeys who develop early immunodeficiency lack serum neutralizing activity or develop a neutralizing antibody response with narrow specificity. Long survival is associated with the ability to neutralize several autologous and heterologous SIVsm reisolates. Infection of macaques with HIV-2SBL6669 did not cause disease within the 5 years observation time and elicited a broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibody response, including neutralization of other, independently obtained, HIV-2 isolates. In HIV-1-infected humans, neutralizing antibodies can only be detected in up to 50% of cases. Neutralizing activity, whenever present, may show a broad specificity, that is, neutralization may occur across genetic subtypes. Presence of broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies is associated with a lower risk of HIV-1 (subtype B) transmission both from mother to child and sexually from male to female. Unlike HIV-1 infection, serum neutralizing activity is regularly present in HIV-2 infection. In view of the differences between HIV-1 and HIV-2 pathogenesis, we suggest that an effective neutralizing antibody response may contribute to a delay in disease progression and to a decrease in risk of transmission. SN - 0165-2478 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8811351/Broad_cross_neutralizing_activity_in_serum_is_associated_with_slow_progression_and_low_risk_of_transmission_in_primate_lentivirus_infections_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0165-2478(96)02561-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -