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Impact of intestinal lengthening on the nutritional outcome for children with short bowel syndrome.
J Pediatr Surg. 1996 Jul; 31(7):912-6.JP

Abstract

Survival among children with short bowel syndrome has increased with the use of supportive nutritional techniques including parenteral and enteral nutrition. Further improvement in outcome has been sought by using intestinal lengthening procedures to lengthen the bowel, improve intestinal motility, initiate a progressive increase in intestinal mucosal mass, and thereby improve tolerance to enteral nutrition. The authors examine the growth parameters and the tolerance to enteral nutrition in children with refractory short bowel syndrome before and after intestinal lengthening procedures. For seven children, the percentage of calories from enteral nutrition, the medical and surgical complications, and the number of days in the hospital (1 year before and 2 years after the lengthening procedure) were evaluated. The mean birth weight was 1,991 g (range, 1,198 to 3,096 g). The initial diagnoses requiring bowel resection included necrotizing enterocolitis, multiple small bowel atresias, gastroschisis with midgut volvulus, cloacal exstrophy, and long-segment Hirschsprung's disease. The mean length of the residual small bowel was 49 cm (range, 6 to 92 cm). All but one child had surgical resection of the ileocecal valve. The percentage of enteral nutrition calories significantly increased by 9 months after the procedure (P < .008, analysis of variance). Only one child has been completely weaned from parenteral nutrition. All children's growth parameters have been maintained or improved (weight/age, height/age, and weight/height). Few major medical and surgical complications have been observed. Central venous catheter infection has been the most common medical complication. The mean number of hospitalization days decreased during the second year after the lengthening procedure. The authors conclude that the intestinal lengthening procedure enhances the tolerance for enteral nutrition, improves the nutritional status, and decreases the need for hospitalization. The procedure should be considered for children with refractory short bowel syndrome who require prolonged parenteral nutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham 35233, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8811555

Citation

Figueroa-Colon, R, et al. "Impact of Intestinal Lengthening On the Nutritional Outcome for Children With Short Bowel Syndrome." Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol. 31, no. 7, 1996, pp. 912-6.
Figueroa-Colon R, Harris PR, Birdsong E, et al. Impact of intestinal lengthening on the nutritional outcome for children with short bowel syndrome. J Pediatr Surg. 1996;31(7):912-6.
Figueroa-Colon, R., Harris, P. R., Birdsong, E., Franklin, F. A., & Georgeson, K. E. (1996). Impact of intestinal lengthening on the nutritional outcome for children with short bowel syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 31(7), 912-6.
Figueroa-Colon R, et al. Impact of Intestinal Lengthening On the Nutritional Outcome for Children With Short Bowel Syndrome. J Pediatr Surg. 1996;31(7):912-6. PubMed PMID: 8811555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of intestinal lengthening on the nutritional outcome for children with short bowel syndrome. AU - Figueroa-Colon,R, AU - Harris,P R, AU - Birdsong,E, AU - Franklin,F A, AU - Georgeson,K E, PY - 1996/7/1/pubmed PY - 1996/7/1/medline PY - 1996/7/1/entrez SP - 912 EP - 6 JF - Journal of pediatric surgery JO - J Pediatr Surg VL - 31 IS - 7 N2 - Survival among children with short bowel syndrome has increased with the use of supportive nutritional techniques including parenteral and enteral nutrition. Further improvement in outcome has been sought by using intestinal lengthening procedures to lengthen the bowel, improve intestinal motility, initiate a progressive increase in intestinal mucosal mass, and thereby improve tolerance to enteral nutrition. The authors examine the growth parameters and the tolerance to enteral nutrition in children with refractory short bowel syndrome before and after intestinal lengthening procedures. For seven children, the percentage of calories from enteral nutrition, the medical and surgical complications, and the number of days in the hospital (1 year before and 2 years after the lengthening procedure) were evaluated. The mean birth weight was 1,991 g (range, 1,198 to 3,096 g). The initial diagnoses requiring bowel resection included necrotizing enterocolitis, multiple small bowel atresias, gastroschisis with midgut volvulus, cloacal exstrophy, and long-segment Hirschsprung's disease. The mean length of the residual small bowel was 49 cm (range, 6 to 92 cm). All but one child had surgical resection of the ileocecal valve. The percentage of enteral nutrition calories significantly increased by 9 months after the procedure (P < .008, analysis of variance). Only one child has been completely weaned from parenteral nutrition. All children's growth parameters have been maintained or improved (weight/age, height/age, and weight/height). Few major medical and surgical complications have been observed. Central venous catheter infection has been the most common medical complication. The mean number of hospitalization days decreased during the second year after the lengthening procedure. The authors conclude that the intestinal lengthening procedure enhances the tolerance for enteral nutrition, improves the nutritional status, and decreases the need for hospitalization. The procedure should be considered for children with refractory short bowel syndrome who require prolonged parenteral nutrition. SN - 0022-3468 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8811555/Impact_of_intestinal_lengthening_on_the_nutritional_outcome_for_children_with_short_bowel_syndrome_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -