Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.
J Appl Physiol (1985) 1996; 81(1):7-18JA

Abstract

Orthostatic intolerance occurs commonly after spaceflight, and important aspects of the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We studied 14 individuals supine and standing before and after three space shuttle missions of 9-14 days. After spaceflight, 9 of the 14 (64%) crew members could not complete a 10-min stand test that all completed preflight. Pre- and postflight supine hemodynamics were similar in both groups except for slightly higher systolic and mean arterial pressures preflight in the finishers [15 +/- 3.7 and 8 +/- 1.2 (SE) mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05]. Postflight, finishers and nonfinishers had equally large postural reductions in stroke volume (-47 +/- 3.7 and -48 +/- 3.3 ml, respectively) and increases in heart rate (35 +/- 6.6 and 51 +/- 5.2 beats/min, respectively). Cardiac output during standing was also similar (3.6 +/- 0.4 and 4.1 +/- 0.3 l/min, respectively). However, the finishers had a greater postflight vasoconstrictor response with higher total peripheral resistance during standing (22.3 +/- 1.2 units preflight and 29.4 +/- 2.3 units postflight) than did the nonfinishers (20.1 +/- 1.1 units preflight and 19.9 +/- 1.4 units postflight). We conclude that 1) the primary systemic hemodynamic event, i.e., the postural decrease in stroke volume, was similar in finishers and nonfinishers and 2) the heart rate response and cardiac output during standing were not significantly different, but 3) the postural vasoconstrictor response was significantly greater among the finishers (P < 0.01).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9034, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8828642

Citation

Buckey, J C., et al. "Orthostatic Intolerance After Spaceflight." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 81, no. 1, 1996, pp. 7-18.
Buckey JC, Lane LD, Levine BD, et al. Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight. J Appl Physiol. 1996;81(1):7-18.
Buckey, J. C., Lane, L. D., Levine, B. D., Watenpaugh, D. E., Wright, S. J., Moore, W. E., ... Blomqvist, C. G. (1996). Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 81(1), pp. 7-18.
Buckey JC, et al. Orthostatic Intolerance After Spaceflight. J Appl Physiol. 1996;81(1):7-18. PubMed PMID: 8828642.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight. AU - Buckey,J C,Jr AU - Lane,L D, AU - Levine,B D, AU - Watenpaugh,D E, AU - Wright,S J, AU - Moore,W E, AU - Gaffney,F A, AU - Blomqvist,C G, PY - 1996/7/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1996/7/1/entrez KW - NASA Discipline Cardiopulmonary KW - NASA Discipline Number 00-00 KW - NASA Discipline Number 14-10 KW - NASA Discipline Number 93-10 KW - NASA Program Flight KW - NASA Program NSCORT KW - NASA Program Space Physiology and Countermeasures KW - Non-NASA Center SP - 7 EP - 18 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 81 IS - 1 N2 - Orthostatic intolerance occurs commonly after spaceflight, and important aspects of the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We studied 14 individuals supine and standing before and after three space shuttle missions of 9-14 days. After spaceflight, 9 of the 14 (64%) crew members could not complete a 10-min stand test that all completed preflight. Pre- and postflight supine hemodynamics were similar in both groups except for slightly higher systolic and mean arterial pressures preflight in the finishers [15 +/- 3.7 and 8 +/- 1.2 (SE) mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05]. Postflight, finishers and nonfinishers had equally large postural reductions in stroke volume (-47 +/- 3.7 and -48 +/- 3.3 ml, respectively) and increases in heart rate (35 +/- 6.6 and 51 +/- 5.2 beats/min, respectively). Cardiac output during standing was also similar (3.6 +/- 0.4 and 4.1 +/- 0.3 l/min, respectively). However, the finishers had a greater postflight vasoconstrictor response with higher total peripheral resistance during standing (22.3 +/- 1.2 units preflight and 29.4 +/- 2.3 units postflight) than did the nonfinishers (20.1 +/- 1.1 units preflight and 19.9 +/- 1.4 units postflight). We conclude that 1) the primary systemic hemodynamic event, i.e., the postural decrease in stroke volume, was similar in finishers and nonfinishers and 2) the heart rate response and cardiac output during standing were not significantly different, but 3) the postural vasoconstrictor response was significantly greater among the finishers (P < 0.01). SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8828642/Orthostatic_intolerance_after_spaceflight_ L2 - http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/jappl.1996.81.1.7?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -