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Effects of early adolescent drug use on cognitive efficacy in early-late adolescence: a developmental structural model.
J Subst Abuse. 1995; 7(4):379-404.JS

Abstract

Despite an accumulated body of research evidence that documents the negative physical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use, it is less clear whether the use of these same substances produces impaired cognitive abilities during the early stages of use. Early drug use may impede acquisition of critical thinking skills and hinder the learning of important cognitive strategies required for successful transition to adulthood. To better understand these relations, longitudinal latent-variable analyses were used to examine the effects of early adolescent drug use on early-late adolescent cognitive efficacy. Latent factors of polydrug use, behavioral control, and cognitive efficacy were hypothesized in early adolescence, the latter two controlling for potential spurious relations. At outcome, six constructs were hypothesized tapping polydrug use, cognitive mastery, self-reinforcement, problem-solving confidence, decision-making skills, and cognitive and affective self-management strategies. Models were psychometrically sound and accounted for large portions of variance. Early adolescent drug use had a small but significant negative effect on cognitive and affective self-management strategies. By the 12th grade, linkages between drug use and cognitive functioning were of larger magnitude than long-term influences, perhaps reinforcing the argument that deficits in cognitive skills are developmentally delayed and surface only with exacerbated or persistent drug use. Overall, specific effects of drug use adversely influenced important cognitive skills that may be critically related to functioning in both interpersonal and intrapersonal domains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Prevention Research, Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY 10021, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8838623

Citation

Scheier, L M., and G J. Botvin. "Effects of Early Adolescent Drug Use On Cognitive Efficacy in Early-late Adolescence: a Developmental Structural Model." Journal of Substance Abuse, vol. 7, no. 4, 1995, pp. 379-404.
Scheier LM, Botvin GJ. Effects of early adolescent drug use on cognitive efficacy in early-late adolescence: a developmental structural model. J Subst Abuse. 1995;7(4):379-404.
Scheier, L. M., & Botvin, G. J. (1995). Effects of early adolescent drug use on cognitive efficacy in early-late adolescence: a developmental structural model. Journal of Substance Abuse, 7(4), 379-404.
Scheier LM, Botvin GJ. Effects of Early Adolescent Drug Use On Cognitive Efficacy in Early-late Adolescence: a Developmental Structural Model. J Subst Abuse. 1995;7(4):379-404. PubMed PMID: 8838623.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of early adolescent drug use on cognitive efficacy in early-late adolescence: a developmental structural model. AU - Scheier,L M, AU - Botvin,G J, PY - 1995/1/1/pubmed PY - 1995/1/1/medline PY - 1995/1/1/entrez SP - 379 EP - 404 JF - Journal of substance abuse JO - J Subst Abuse VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - Despite an accumulated body of research evidence that documents the negative physical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use, it is less clear whether the use of these same substances produces impaired cognitive abilities during the early stages of use. Early drug use may impede acquisition of critical thinking skills and hinder the learning of important cognitive strategies required for successful transition to adulthood. To better understand these relations, longitudinal latent-variable analyses were used to examine the effects of early adolescent drug use on early-late adolescent cognitive efficacy. Latent factors of polydrug use, behavioral control, and cognitive efficacy were hypothesized in early adolescence, the latter two controlling for potential spurious relations. At outcome, six constructs were hypothesized tapping polydrug use, cognitive mastery, self-reinforcement, problem-solving confidence, decision-making skills, and cognitive and affective self-management strategies. Models were psychometrically sound and accounted for large portions of variance. Early adolescent drug use had a small but significant negative effect on cognitive and affective self-management strategies. By the 12th grade, linkages between drug use and cognitive functioning were of larger magnitude than long-term influences, perhaps reinforcing the argument that deficits in cognitive skills are developmentally delayed and surface only with exacerbated or persistent drug use. Overall, specific effects of drug use adversely influenced important cognitive skills that may be critically related to functioning in both interpersonal and intrapersonal domains. SN - 0899-3289 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8838623/Effects_of_early_adolescent_drug_use_on_cognitive_efficacy_in_early_late_adolescence:_a_developmental_structural_model_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/druguseandaddiction.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -