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Thromboembolic disease developing during oral contraceptive therapy in young females with antiphospholipid antibodies.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1996 Jun; 7(4):497-501.BC

Abstract

The role of oral contraceptives as a triggering factor for thrombosis in patients with lupus anticoagulant (LA) and/or anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) has not yet been established. We describe the cases of three women aged 19, 29 and 48 years who developed venous thrombosis after 16 +/- 3.4 (mean +/- SD) cycles of oral contraceptives. They were all asymptomatic before taking the pill. Two patients subsequently developed venous and/or arterial recurrence of thrombosis. Laboratory studies performed after the diagnosis of thrombosis, showed the presence of LA and elevated levels of ACA (IgG and IgM) in all three patients. None of these patients had autoimmune diseases and therefore appeared to have a primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. The three patients belonged to a group of 45 young females who experienced their first thrombotic event while taking the pill. This group had a similar prevalence (8%) for antithrombin deficiency and antiphospholipid antibodies. We surmise that some of the women who developed venous thrombosis while taking the pill might have an undetected primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Medical Semeiotics, University of Padua Medical School, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8840004

Citation

Girolami, A, et al. "Thromboembolic Disease Developing During Oral Contraceptive Therapy in Young Females With Antiphospholipid Antibodies." Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis : an International Journal in Haemostasis and Thrombosis, vol. 7, no. 4, 1996, pp. 497-501.
Girolami A, Zanon E, Zanardi S, et al. Thromboembolic disease developing during oral contraceptive therapy in young females with antiphospholipid antibodies. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1996;7(4):497-501.
Girolami, A., Zanon, E., Zanardi, S., Saracino, M. A., & Simioni, P. (1996). Thromboembolic disease developing during oral contraceptive therapy in young females with antiphospholipid antibodies. Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis : an International Journal in Haemostasis and Thrombosis, 7(4), 497-501.
Girolami A, et al. Thromboembolic Disease Developing During Oral Contraceptive Therapy in Young Females With Antiphospholipid Antibodies. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1996;7(4):497-501. PubMed PMID: 8840004.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thromboembolic disease developing during oral contraceptive therapy in young females with antiphospholipid antibodies. AU - Girolami,A, AU - Zanon,E, AU - Zanardi,S, AU - Saracino,M A, AU - Simioni,P, PY - 1996/6/1/pubmed PY - 1996/6/1/medline PY - 1996/6/1/entrez KW - Antibodies KW - Biology KW - Case Studies KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Developed Countries KW - Diseases KW - Embolism KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Immunity KW - Immunologic Factors KW - Italy KW - Lipids KW - Mediterranean Countries KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Oral Contraceptives, Combined KW - Physiology KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Southern Europe KW - Studies KW - Thromboembolism KW - Thrombosis--women KW - Treatment KW - Vascular Diseases SP - 497 EP - 501 JF - Blood coagulation & fibrinolysis : an international journal in haemostasis and thrombosis JO - Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - The role of oral contraceptives as a triggering factor for thrombosis in patients with lupus anticoagulant (LA) and/or anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) has not yet been established. We describe the cases of three women aged 19, 29 and 48 years who developed venous thrombosis after 16 +/- 3.4 (mean +/- SD) cycles of oral contraceptives. They were all asymptomatic before taking the pill. Two patients subsequently developed venous and/or arterial recurrence of thrombosis. Laboratory studies performed after the diagnosis of thrombosis, showed the presence of LA and elevated levels of ACA (IgG and IgM) in all three patients. None of these patients had autoimmune diseases and therefore appeared to have a primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. The three patients belonged to a group of 45 young females who experienced their first thrombotic event while taking the pill. This group had a similar prevalence (8%) for antithrombin deficiency and antiphospholipid antibodies. We surmise that some of the women who developed venous thrombosis while taking the pill might have an undetected primary antiphospholipid syndrome. SN - 0957-5235 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8840004/Thromboembolic_disease_developing_during_oral_contraceptive_therapy_in_young_females_with_antiphospholipid_antibodies_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=8840004.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -