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Sexual differentiation of odor and partner preference in the rat.
Physiol Behav. 1996 Aug; 60(2):489-94.PB

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that adult male rats, in which brain estrogen formation was inhibited neonatally by SC administration of the aromatase inhibitor 1,4, 6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD), show an altered sexual partner preference. When tested in a three-compartment box, such gonadally intact ATD males approach and mate both with the estrous female and the sexually active male, whereas normal males prefer to approach and mate with the estrous female, avoiding the stimulus male. After castration in adulthood and estradiol treatment, ATD males prefer sexually active males. Similarly treated normal males prefer estrous females, and estrous females prefer to mate with males. In the present study, we asked what stimulus characteristics of active males vs. estrous females determined the different sexual preferences of males, ATD males, and of females. Were they chemosensory cues or more distal cues such as actually seeing and hearing the stimulus animals or the reward of sexual activity with the stimulus animals? Sex differences in preference were evident when animals were given a choice between soiled bedding from estrous females and from sexually active males. ATD and control males spent significantly more time on soiled bedding from estrous females than on soiled bedding from sexually active males. Control females spent significantly more time on soiled bedding from sexually active males than on soiled bedding from estrous females. More distal cues, such as seeing and hearing the stimulus animals, revealed differences in preference between control males and females, but not between ATD and control males. Physical interaction with the stimulus animals was a prerequisite for revealing differences in preference between ATD and control males. Then, the behavior of ATD males was clearly intermediate between that of normal male and female rats. In conclusion, neonatal estradiol is important for the psychosexual development of the male rat. However, the present data suggest that the psychosexual development of the male rat also requires either prenatal estradiol or perinatal testosterone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology & Reproduction, Faculty of Medicine, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. bakker@biology.bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8840910

Citation

Bakker, J, et al. "Sexual Differentiation of Odor and Partner Preference in the Rat." Physiology & Behavior, vol. 60, no. 2, 1996, pp. 489-94.
Bakker J, Van Ophemert J, Slob AK. Sexual differentiation of odor and partner preference in the rat. Physiol Behav. 1996;60(2):489-94.
Bakker, J., Van Ophemert, J., & Slob, A. K. (1996). Sexual differentiation of odor and partner preference in the rat. Physiology & Behavior, 60(2), 489-94.
Bakker J, Van Ophemert J, Slob AK. Sexual Differentiation of Odor and Partner Preference in the Rat. Physiol Behav. 1996;60(2):489-94. PubMed PMID: 8840910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual differentiation of odor and partner preference in the rat. AU - Bakker,J, AU - Van Ophemert,J, AU - Slob,A K, PY - 1996/8/1/pubmed PY - 1996/8/1/medline PY - 1996/8/1/entrez SP - 489 EP - 94 JF - Physiology & behavior JO - Physiol Behav VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - Previous studies have shown that adult male rats, in which brain estrogen formation was inhibited neonatally by SC administration of the aromatase inhibitor 1,4, 6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD), show an altered sexual partner preference. When tested in a three-compartment box, such gonadally intact ATD males approach and mate both with the estrous female and the sexually active male, whereas normal males prefer to approach and mate with the estrous female, avoiding the stimulus male. After castration in adulthood and estradiol treatment, ATD males prefer sexually active males. Similarly treated normal males prefer estrous females, and estrous females prefer to mate with males. In the present study, we asked what stimulus characteristics of active males vs. estrous females determined the different sexual preferences of males, ATD males, and of females. Were they chemosensory cues or more distal cues such as actually seeing and hearing the stimulus animals or the reward of sexual activity with the stimulus animals? Sex differences in preference were evident when animals were given a choice between soiled bedding from estrous females and from sexually active males. ATD and control males spent significantly more time on soiled bedding from estrous females than on soiled bedding from sexually active males. Control females spent significantly more time on soiled bedding from sexually active males than on soiled bedding from estrous females. More distal cues, such as seeing and hearing the stimulus animals, revealed differences in preference between control males and females, but not between ATD and control males. Physical interaction with the stimulus animals was a prerequisite for revealing differences in preference between ATD and control males. Then, the behavior of ATD males was clearly intermediate between that of normal male and female rats. In conclusion, neonatal estradiol is important for the psychosexual development of the male rat. However, the present data suggest that the psychosexual development of the male rat also requires either prenatal estradiol or perinatal testosterone. SN - 0031-9384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8840910/Sexual_differentiation_of_odor_and_partner_preference_in_the_rat_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0031938496000662 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -