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Variceal and portal pressure measurement: techniques and applications.
Ital J Gastroenterol. 1996 Jun; 28(5):272-9.IJ

Abstract

Variceal and portal pressure measurements are currently the most widely used invasive techniques for the haemodynamic evaluation of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Variceal pressure can be measured during endoscopy either directly by variceal puncture or indirectly by using a pressure sensitive gauge. More recently, an indirect technique which uses a plastic balloon attached to the end of the endoscope has been described. Variceal pressure appears to be an important risk factor for the occurrence of variceal haemorrhage as most studies concluded that variceal pressure tends to be higher in patients with previous bleeding than those without. Hepatic venous catheterization with measurements of the wedged and free hepatic pressures has become the method of choice in the estimation of portal pressure as it is a simple, fast and safe procedure, less invasive and more reproducible than the other techniques. Information obtained from hepatic vein catheterization gives a significant prognostic value in predicting survival. Despite the lack of a linear relationship between portal pressure and risk of variceal bleeding most prospective studies have concluded that the height of portal pressure is an important and independent predictive factor for bleeding. Hepatic venous catheterization is currently the best method of assessing the haemodynamic response to drug treatment and prediction of therapeutic response for the prevention of bleeding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8842846

Citation

Armonis, A, et al. "Variceal and Portal Pressure Measurement: Techniques and Applications." The Italian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 28, no. 5, 1996, pp. 272-9.
Armonis A, Patch D, Burroughs A. Variceal and portal pressure measurement: techniques and applications. Ital J Gastroenterol. 1996;28(5):272-9.
Armonis, A., Patch, D., & Burroughs, A. (1996). Variceal and portal pressure measurement: techniques and applications. The Italian Journal of Gastroenterology, 28(5), 272-9.
Armonis A, Patch D, Burroughs A. Variceal and Portal Pressure Measurement: Techniques and Applications. Ital J Gastroenterol. 1996;28(5):272-9. PubMed PMID: 8842846.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Variceal and portal pressure measurement: techniques and applications. AU - Armonis,A, AU - Patch,D, AU - Burroughs,A, PY - 1996/6/1/pubmed PY - 1996/6/1/medline PY - 1996/6/1/entrez SP - 272 EP - 9 JF - The Italian journal of gastroenterology JO - Ital J Gastroenterol VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - Variceal and portal pressure measurements are currently the most widely used invasive techniques for the haemodynamic evaluation of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Variceal pressure can be measured during endoscopy either directly by variceal puncture or indirectly by using a pressure sensitive gauge. More recently, an indirect technique which uses a plastic balloon attached to the end of the endoscope has been described. Variceal pressure appears to be an important risk factor for the occurrence of variceal haemorrhage as most studies concluded that variceal pressure tends to be higher in patients with previous bleeding than those without. Hepatic venous catheterization with measurements of the wedged and free hepatic pressures has become the method of choice in the estimation of portal pressure as it is a simple, fast and safe procedure, less invasive and more reproducible than the other techniques. Information obtained from hepatic vein catheterization gives a significant prognostic value in predicting survival. Despite the lack of a linear relationship between portal pressure and risk of variceal bleeding most prospective studies have concluded that the height of portal pressure is an important and independent predictive factor for bleeding. Hepatic venous catheterization is currently the best method of assessing the haemodynamic response to drug treatment and prediction of therapeutic response for the prevention of bleeding. SN - 0392-0623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8842846/Variceal_and_portal_pressure_measurement:_techniques_and_applications_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -