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T cell activation and human immunodeficiency virus replication after influenza immunization of infected children.
Pediatr Infect Dis J 1996; 15(3):197-203PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

T cell activation plays a major role in the ability of HIV to remain latent or to establish a productive infection. It has been hypothesized that vaccination-mediated immune stimulation can activate T cells and enhance HIV replication. Our study was designed to determine whether influenza immunization would induce T cell activation and increase HIV burdens in HIV-infected children.

METHODS

Blood samples from 16 HIV-infected children ages 6 months to 14 years were obtained immediately before and 2 and 6 to 8 weeks after the administration of influenza vaccine. The percentage of activated (CD25+) T cells was determined by flow cytometry, and HIV viral load was measured by quantitative cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma HIV RNA.

RESULTS

The administration of influenza vaccine was associated with significant increases in HIV viral load in 5 of 16 children evaluated. These increases in HIV burden were transient, and in four of five patients the plasma HIV RNA copy number returned to baseline 6 to 8 weeks after immunization. There was no correlation between the patient's immunologic or clinical category according to the CDC classification and either the initial viral load or the likelihood of having a significant increase after immunization. Four of the five patients who experienced increases in viral load after influenza immunization were not receiving antiretroviral therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results emphasize the need for additional studies that examine the effect of routine immunizations on T cell activation and HIV replication in HIV-infected children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8852906

Citation

Ramilo, O, et al. "T Cell Activation and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication After Influenza Immunization of Infected Children." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 15, no. 3, 1996, pp. 197-203.
Ramilo O, Hicks PJ, Borvak J, et al. T cell activation and human immunodeficiency virus replication after influenza immunization of infected children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1996;15(3):197-203.
Ramilo, O., Hicks, P. J., Borvak, J., Gross, L. M., Zhong, D., Squires, J. E., & Vitetta, E. S. (1996). T cell activation and human immunodeficiency virus replication after influenza immunization of infected children. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 15(3), pp. 197-203.
Ramilo O, et al. T Cell Activation and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication After Influenza Immunization of Infected Children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1996;15(3):197-203. PubMed PMID: 8852906.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - T cell activation and human immunodeficiency virus replication after influenza immunization of infected children. AU - Ramilo,O, AU - Hicks,P J, AU - Borvak,J, AU - Gross,L M, AU - Zhong,D, AU - Squires,J E, AU - Vitetta,E S, PY - 1996/3/1/pubmed PY - 1996/3/1/medline PY - 1996/3/1/entrez SP - 197 EP - 203 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: T cell activation plays a major role in the ability of HIV to remain latent or to establish a productive infection. It has been hypothesized that vaccination-mediated immune stimulation can activate T cells and enhance HIV replication. Our study was designed to determine whether influenza immunization would induce T cell activation and increase HIV burdens in HIV-infected children. METHODS: Blood samples from 16 HIV-infected children ages 6 months to 14 years were obtained immediately before and 2 and 6 to 8 weeks after the administration of influenza vaccine. The percentage of activated (CD25+) T cells was determined by flow cytometry, and HIV viral load was measured by quantitative cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma HIV RNA. RESULTS: The administration of influenza vaccine was associated with significant increases in HIV viral load in 5 of 16 children evaluated. These increases in HIV burden were transient, and in four of five patients the plasma HIV RNA copy number returned to baseline 6 to 8 weeks after immunization. There was no correlation between the patient's immunologic or clinical category according to the CDC classification and either the initial viral load or the likelihood of having a significant increase after immunization. Four of the five patients who experienced increases in viral load after influenza immunization were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasize the need for additional studies that examine the effect of routine immunizations on T cell activation and HIV replication in HIV-infected children. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8852906/T_cell_activation_and_human_immunodeficiency_virus_replication_after_influenza_immunization_of_infected_children_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=8852906 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -