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The effects of pre-exercise starch ingestion on endurance performance.
Int J Sports Med. 1996 Jul; 17(5):366-72.IJ

Abstract

This study compared the physiological responses and performance following the ingestion of a waxy starch (WS), resistant starch (RS), glucose (GL) and an artificially-sweetened placebo (PL) ingested prior to exercise. Ten college-age, male competitive cyclists completed four experimental protocols consisting of a 30 min isokinetic, self-paced performance ride preceded by 90 min of constant load cycling at 66% VO2max. Thirty min prior to exercise, they ingested 1 g.kg-1 body weight of GL, WS, RS, or PL At rest, GL elicited greater (p < 0.05) serum glucose and insulin responses than all other trials. During exercise, however, serum glucose, insulin, blood C-peptide and glucagon responses were similar among trials. The mean total carbohydrate oxidation rates (CHOox) were higher (p < 0.05) during the GL, WS, and RS trials (2.59 +/- 0.13, 2.49 +/- 0.10, and 2.71 +/- 0.15 g.min-1, respectively) compared to PL (2.35 +/- 0.12 g.min-1). Subjects were able to complete more work (p < 0.05) during the performance ride when they ingested GL (434 +/- 25.2 kj) or WS (428 +/- 22.5 kj) compared to PL (403 +/- 35.1 kj). They also tended to produce more work with RS ingestion (418 +/- 31.4 kj), although this did not reach statistical significance (p < 0.09). These results indicate that preexercise CHO ingestion in the form of starch or glucose maintained higher rates of total carbohydrate oxidation during exercise and provided an ergogenic benefit during self-paced cycling.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8858409

Citation

Goodpaster, B H., et al. "The Effects of Pre-exercise Starch Ingestion On Endurance Performance." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 17, no. 5, 1996, pp. 366-72.
Goodpaster BH, Costill DL, Fink WJ, et al. The effects of pre-exercise starch ingestion on endurance performance. Int J Sports Med. 1996;17(5):366-72.
Goodpaster, B. H., Costill, D. L., Fink, W. J., Trappe, T. A., Jozsi, A. C., Starling, R. D., & Trappe, S. W. (1996). The effects of pre-exercise starch ingestion on endurance performance. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17(5), 366-72.
Goodpaster BH, et al. The Effects of Pre-exercise Starch Ingestion On Endurance Performance. Int J Sports Med. 1996;17(5):366-72. PubMed PMID: 8858409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of pre-exercise starch ingestion on endurance performance. AU - Goodpaster,B H, AU - Costill,D L, AU - Fink,W J, AU - Trappe,T A, AU - Jozsi,A C, AU - Starling,R D, AU - Trappe,S W, PY - 1996/7/1/pubmed PY - 1996/7/1/medline PY - 1996/7/1/entrez SP - 366 EP - 72 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - This study compared the physiological responses and performance following the ingestion of a waxy starch (WS), resistant starch (RS), glucose (GL) and an artificially-sweetened placebo (PL) ingested prior to exercise. Ten college-age, male competitive cyclists completed four experimental protocols consisting of a 30 min isokinetic, self-paced performance ride preceded by 90 min of constant load cycling at 66% VO2max. Thirty min prior to exercise, they ingested 1 g.kg-1 body weight of GL, WS, RS, or PL At rest, GL elicited greater (p < 0.05) serum glucose and insulin responses than all other trials. During exercise, however, serum glucose, insulin, blood C-peptide and glucagon responses were similar among trials. The mean total carbohydrate oxidation rates (CHOox) were higher (p < 0.05) during the GL, WS, and RS trials (2.59 +/- 0.13, 2.49 +/- 0.10, and 2.71 +/- 0.15 g.min-1, respectively) compared to PL (2.35 +/- 0.12 g.min-1). Subjects were able to complete more work (p < 0.05) during the performance ride when they ingested GL (434 +/- 25.2 kj) or WS (428 +/- 22.5 kj) compared to PL (403 +/- 35.1 kj). They also tended to produce more work with RS ingestion (418 +/- 31.4 kj), although this did not reach statistical significance (p < 0.09). These results indicate that preexercise CHO ingestion in the form of starch or glucose maintained higher rates of total carbohydrate oxidation during exercise and provided an ergogenic benefit during self-paced cycling. SN - 0172-4622 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8858409/The_effects_of_pre_exercise_starch_ingestion_on_endurance_performance_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-972862 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -